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Installing a stair lift or hiring an electric wheelchair and visits to day care centres for a change of view and some company are other ways that you can help your relative to stay living at home.

There are a number of changes that can be made at home, ranging from stair lifts and electric wheelchairs to smaller items that will ease comfort of day-to-day living, such as gadgets for preparing food and drink safely and ways to make the bedroom comfortable and safe.

1. Home adaptations
2. Personal alarms
3. Day care centres

Home adaptations

There are a number of changes that can be made at home, ranging from installing stair lifts and using electronic wheelchairs to smaller items that will ease comfort of day-to-day living, such as gadgets for preparing food and drink safely and ways to make the bedroom comfortable and safe. We cover this information in our guide to home alterations.

You may want to employ an occupational therapist to assess your relative and home to ensure you have the most suitable support.

Personal alarms

It is possible for your relative to get various personal electronic alarms to help them remain in their own home more safely and to provide you with extra security and peace of mind in case of emergency. For information about equipment and technology for inside and outside the home, see our guide to assistive technologies for older people, which also includes a page about basic personal alarms when out and about.

Day care centres

These centres offer meals and social activities to older people during the day - for more information, see Types of respite care. Transport to and from the centre is usually provided. For more information about potential day care centres in your relative’s area, enter his or her postcode in our Care services directory and then use the ‘Local authority services’ tab on the resulting page.

More information

Page last reviewed: August 2016 
Next review due: October 2018