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If you think your relative is struggling, or not receiving the care they need, you can take action to put things right. Your approach will depend on your relative’s current living situation.

On this page you can find the information you need according to the current living arrangements of your relative.

1. Living at home without care services
2. Living at home and receiving home care services
3. Living in sheltered housing
4. Living in a residential home (personal care only)
5. Living in a nursing home

Living at home without care services

Could your relative benefit from home care services? These can help with personal care such as washing, dressing and going to the toilet. Or would they benefit from home help services, which can help with practical tasks such as cleaning?

Action

  • Contact the local authority for a needs assessment and to see what is available in your area.

More information 

Living at home and receiving home care services

Does your relative need additional support at home which their current care provider could supply?

Action

  • If care is council-funded, contact social services for additional help. 
  • If your relative requires an additional carer or increased hours of help, their care plan may need to be reviewed and updated. 
  • If care is self-funded, contact the care agency directly about getting more support. The council or agency should then produce a revised care plan that provides the help your relative needs. 
  • If the need for care is substantial, home care services may no longer be the answer and it might be time to consider residential care.

More information 

Living in sheltered housing

Is there an option to get more care while your relative lives in their current scheme?

Action

  • Some schemes offer extra care or specific help for people with certain illnesses, such as dementia. It might be possible for your relative to get domiciliary care services to come in from outside. 
  • If care needs have changed dramatically, it may be time to consider a care home. Your relative should get a needs assessment.

More information 

Living in a residential home (personal care only)

If you feel that your relative’s care needs have changed, speak to the care home manager. They can speak to the staff involved with your relative’s care to ask for their feedback. They can also reassess your relative’s needs to ensure that the care plan they have is still meeting their needs. If necessary, they can update your relative’s care plan to provide the extra support they need.

If your relative’s needs have changed substantially and they require nursing care, they may need to move to a different care home that offers nursing care in addition to personal care.

Action

  • If your relative’s residential care is funded (in full or part) by the council, contact the local authority for a review of their care needs. 
  • If your relative privately funds their own care, you may need to think about choosing a nursing home.

More information

Living in a nursing home

If you feel that your relative’s care needs have changed, speak to the care home manager. They can reassess your relative’s needs to ensure that their care plan is still relevant. If necessary, they can update your relative’s care plan to provide the extra support they need.

Action

  • If you think your relative has become eligible for NHS continuing healthcare or NHS-funded care, contact his or her social worker or if your relative is in a care home, discuss the position with the care home manager.

More information

Page last reviewed: 31 December 2015
Next review due: 30 April 2017