Pots of fruitPot success for fruit plants

14 October 2005

Fruit plants that yield an abundant crop can successfully be grown in pots, according to new trial results from Gardening Which?.

In the trial gooseberries and strawberries did particularly well, bearing impressive crops in their first summer.

Raspberries, a fruit that does not have a good reputation for thriving in pots, produced a good harvest, as did the orange, lemon and lime trees.

Fruit that requires specific soil types, for example blueberries, which need free draining acid conditions to thrive, proved to be perfect for potting.

Our experts found that plants confined to containers with compost that suits them can be grown regardless of soil type.

Researchers also found that growing fruit in pots was a good way of overcoming difficulties such as pest infestation and bird damage, because smaller plants are easier to protect and treat.

Like their larger counterparts, potted fruit have decorative spring blossom and attractive foliage, making them striking additions to patios and conservatories.

The editor of Gardening Which?, Julia Boulton said: 'As well as being productive, many fruit trees and bushes make beautiful plants in their own right. Growing them in pots makes good sense if you're short of space.

'Even a humble gooseberry trained as a standard can be every bit as elegant as a much pricier clipped bay tree or box shrub.'