Majority back moves to stop drivers smokingOthers say ban should cover some outdoor places

19 May 2007

Almost two-thirds of British people believe there should be a ban on smoking while driving a car, a survey has revealed.

The Populus poll for the BBC's Daily Politics show found a move to stop drivers lighting up behind the wheel - which has been urged by safety campaigners - would be backed by 62 per cent of people.

Support for a ban is higher among women than men, with 70 per cent in favour compared to 54 per cent.

The over-55s are most in favour of an end to smoking behind the wheel, with 71 per cent supporting it, while 55 per cent of those in the 35-54 age group and 60 per cent of 18 to 34-year-olds would back a ban.

The poll of 1,000 people also found that 81 per cent of the British population support the smoking ban on enclosed public and work places, which comes into force on July 1 in England and has already been introduced in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Outdoor smoking

And more than half (51 per cent) of 18 to 34-year-olds feel the ban should go further, outlawing smoking in some public outdoor places such as bus shelters or parks.

Overall, 45 per cent of those questioned would support a broadening of the ban to cover some outdoor places, the poll found.

There was also overwhelming backing for a ban on smoking near children, with 91 per cent of people in favour of such a move. Women were particularly supportive of preventing smoking near youngsters, with 94 per cent giving it their backing.

The Press Association, All Rights Reserved.