British dishes shunned by teenagersEccles cakes and Cornish pasties off the menu

05 July 2007

Scores of traditional British dishes could die out because teenagers simply don't eat them, a survey found.

Steak and kidney pie, clotted cream and Eccles cake are all virtually off the menu for youngsters, according to Sainsbury's.

A poll for the chain found one fifth of 16 to 19-year-olds had never eaten a Cornish pasty.

Cornish pasty

Respondents in this age group were 'significantly' less interested in traditional British dishes than older consumers, the poll of 1,811 people found.

More than 65 per cent of 16 to 19s had never eaten a Melton Mowbray pie while 42 per cent had never tasted steak and kidney pies.

More than half (54 per cent) of the teenagers had never tried Eccles cake while 49 per cent had never tasted clotted cream.

Dover sole, haggis, faggots and Caerphilly cheese were also far less popular with 16 to 19-year-olds than the over 20s.

Sainsbury's food and innovation centre boss Ian Jarmarkier said the findings were bad news for traditional British dishes.

British dishes

'It's a really worrying trend that young people have so little enthusiasm for local cuisine,' he said.

The poll also uncovered a range of traditional dishes which were virtually unknown amongst respondents of all age groups.

Fewer than 3 per cent of all the people surveyed had ever tasted Richmond eel pie, Kentish pigeons, Alnwick stew or Gloucestershire squab pie.

Sainsbury's released the findings today to coincide with the launch of its Best of British campaign to promote traditional dishes.

The online survey of 1,811 over 16s was carried out in April by tickbox.net for the supermarket chain.

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