Britons spending more on fruit and vegetablesBut traditional fruits are in decline

03 July 2007

 

 

Britons eat 2.6 portions of fruit and vegetables on average per day, latest figures show.

Spending on fresh produce rose by 5.2 per cent to £7.6 billion over the past year, according to market analyst TNS Worldpanel.

Children showed the largest increase in fruit and vegetable consumption at 2.2 portions per day compared with 1.8 the previous year.

Rising fruit and vegetable prices were the main factor behind the increased spending, according to TNS.

Niche fruits

Spokesman Tom Hogg said: 'A key trend is the decline in shopper numbers for traditional staple fruits such as bananas, apples and pears, while more consumers are buying what used to be considered niche fruit types.'

Pomegranates and mangoes have seen a 'significant' popularity upturn, the research shows.

Spending on fruit and vegetables combined increased 5.2 per cent compared with the previous year, although the volume of fresh produce purchased dipped by 1.3 per cent.

Organic produce

Organic produce enjoyed a 9.1 per cent upturn in spending but still only accounts for 3.4 per cent of the market.

The TNS Worldpanel data is gathered from an ongoing survey of 20,000 British households.

It represents produce bought from shops to take home. It discounts food bought in restaurants, cafes and shops to eat outside the home.

The TNS figures relate to the year ending 25 March, 2007.

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