Motorists lacking map reading skillsMany relying on sat navs to tell them the way

06 August 2007

 

Satelitte navigation system in car

More than a third of motorists cannot read a basic road map, a survey out today showed.

And more than four in five fail to recognise that blue-coloured roads on maps signify motorways, the poll from Esure car insurance found.

Based on responses from 1,000 UK drivers, the research also revealed that 16 per cent no longer keep a map in their car.

More than three in five have out-of-date maps, with about the same number saying they could not live without their sat nav system.

Road symbols

But 50 per cent reckon their sat nav drives them mad at least once a month.

The survey also showed that only 1 per cent of those polled would qualify for a Cub Scout map-reader badge.

Scottish drivers are the poorest at recognising basic road symbols on maps, with south east England motorists the best.

‘Potentially dangerous’

Men claimed to be better at reading maps than women, although the survey results showed fairly equal skills between the sexes.

Colin Batabyal, Director of underwriting and business development at Esure, said: ‘It's pretty embarrassing that the majority of Cub Scouts have better map-reading skills than the majority of the adult population.

‘This could potentially lead to dangerous scenarios where people are relying solely on technology which can break down.’

© The Press Association, All rights reserved.