Disabled parking cheats targetedBlue Badge scheme to be extended and overhauled

25 January 2008

The government has announced a crackdown on the fraudulent use of Blue Badges under the disabled parking scheme.

Among the proposals are plans to make the Blue Badge available to more people who need it and make it easier to take action against those who steal, forge or fraudulently use it.

The changes will mean:

  • more parents of severely disabled children will be eligible for a badge
  • parking attendants will have more powers to confiscate forged, fraudulently used or stolen badges
  • improved security of the badge to prevent forgeries
  • creation of a national data bank to identify Blue Badge cheats.

Helping parents

The Disabled Person’s Parking Badge Scheme was introduced nationally in 1971 to give on-street parking concessions to disabled people so they could get to shops and amenities more easily.

Transport Minister Rosie Winterton said of the scheme: 'I am proposing to extend its reach to help more people, including a greater number of parents who have to transport bulky medical equipment with their children and people with severe autism.'

Which?  parking spokesman Bob Tolliday said: ‘Any changes that see Blue Badges go to the people who most deserve them are to be applauded. It is also good to see more being done to stop them being used illegally.’