Third of shoppers won't complainWe have tips for dealing with shoddy service

03 April 2008

Making a complaint

You can provide feedback or seek advice on the service you received

One in three consumers don't think it’s worth complaining if they get lumbered with shoddy goods or services, according to a new poll.

The survey of 2,000 people also found that a fifth preferred not to complain at all, while a tenth said that they would usually ask someone else to complain for them.

Young people between the ages of 16 and 29 are least likely to complain, according the poll from the government advice service Consumer Direct.

Customer service

But it’s important that consumers aren't afraid of complaining.

Which? can offer you help and advice if you feel short-changed by a company, or left with goods that aren't up to scratch.

If you have a problem you'll first need to contact the shop, trader or service provider to get it sorted out.

Sample letters

You might be able to get things sorted out quickly and easily by talking to the shop or trader in person or over the phone, and often an informal approach is enough to get things put right.

But if it’s a complicated or serious problem, or if the company you're dealing with is unhelpful, you’ll need to take stronger action.

Our report on complaining to companies offers advice on what to do and also provides sample letters. It details which laws to quote to strengthen your case and what to do if a company doesn’t respond.