Latest council recycling rates revealedOver 37% of household rubbish now recycled

05 November 2009


Make the most of your doorstep recycling service

The amount of household rubbish recycled by English councils in the last year increased to 37.6% and the amount of rubbish collected decreased by over a million tonnes, according to new figures published today.

Defra's annual survey of council recycling rates showed a rise of over 3% from 34.5% in 2007/8, and shows a continued improvement in recycling levels, which were at 11.2% in 2000/1.

But recycling performance continued to vary between councils and regions.

Council recycling rates 

Regional household recycling and composting rates ranged from less than 30% in London to almost 45% in the East and East Midlands regions.

The top performing council was Staffordshire Moorlands District Council, which achieved a recycling and composting rate of 61.58%. Bottom of the pile was the London Borough of Newham, with a recycling rate of just 15.4%.

Rochford District Council, Rutland County Council and Warwick District Council were the three most improved councils. Rochford saw an increase of over 30% compared to its 2007/8 figures.

How to recycle

Our product recycling tool can help you find where and how to recycle a range of electrical and household products including TVs, DVD players, washing machines and fridge freezers.

Our essential recycling guide will equip you with some recycling basics.

Rubbish and waste

The total amount of municipal waste collected decreased by 1.2m tonnes to an estimated 27.5m tonnes in England - compared to 28.5m tonnes in 2007/8, a decrease of 4.1%. Of this, 13.8m tonnes went to landfill.

Last month the Local Government Association warned the cost of collecting and disposing of rubbish could rise by £1.1bn by 2013, as the government set out its vision for a 'zero waste nation' - including the aim to ban certain recyclable materials from being sent to landfill in future.

Environment Minister Dan Norris said: 'These results are very encouraging and show that we're moving down the right road to becoming a zero waste nation. What we need to do now is to think about reducing what we use and reusing what we can.'

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