New logo helps consumers avoid scam ticket sitesOne in ten scammed by fake ticket websites

11 October 2011

STAR Kitemark for ticket selling websites

STAR has launched a new kitemark to make it easier for consumers to identify reputable ticket sellers

One in ten people was scammed by a fake ticket website last year, according to research by the Society of Ticket Agencies and Retailers (STAR).

To combat ticket fraud, which costs victims an estimated £168m a year, STAR has launched a new kitemark that identifies reputable outlets.

Read our top tips to help you spot a scam ticketing site.

Logo for genuine ticket sites

STAR members, which include major companies such as See Tickets, Ticketmaster and The Ticket Factory, follow a self-regulating code of conduct that includes a dispute resolution service for consumers.

Major entertainment organisations such as The Society of London Theatre have signed up to support the kitemark scheme and display the logo, either online or at the box office.

Secretary of STAR Jonathan Brown says: ‘By educating ticket buyers to choose authorised ticket sellers that operate under the STAR kitemark, we can help to significantly reduce ticket fraud and the damaging effect it has on the industry, as well as the potentially devastating consequences for consumers.’

£168mThe annual cost of ticket fraud, according to the National Fraud Authority

Questions to ask before buying tickets online

STAR has put together some top tips to help consumers avoid ticket scams.

1) Is the seller authorised to sell tickets by the venue where the event takes place?
Search for STAR members at

2) Have you checked the seller's company details?
Check where the company is registered and that the site displays company contact details. When paying, make sure you are directed to a secure site, indicated by an ‘s’ appearing after the http at the beginning of the page URL.

3) Has the seller told you the face value of the ticket?
A seller is legally obliged to inform you of the face value of the ticket before selling it to you.

4) Is the ticket a restricted view ticket?
A seller legally has to tell you if the ticket is restricted view before you buy it.

5) Have you read and understood the terms and conditions?


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