Child Accident Prevention Trust - 'kids are at risk'Protect your child this Child Safety Week

18 June 2012

Child safety at home

Protect your child with our child safety advice

The Child Accident Prevention Trust has discovered that stressed and busy parents are finding it hard to take time to protect their children from preventable accidents.

This research comes at the start of Child Safety Week (18-22 June 2012), which urges parents to make changes to prevent potentially lethal accidents.

Children at risk

The Child Accident Prevention Trust research shows that a high number of parents don't take steps to make sure their child is safe – for example, only one in five parents make hot drinks inaccessible, and less than a third ensure that cleaning products are out of reach.

18% of parents admit to not ensuring their children are safe on every car journey, and only one in 10 make sure their child knows how to cycle safely on the roads.

Which? deputy home editor Hazel Cottrell says: 'Child safety is paramount, and Which? tests baby and child products thoroughly to ensure they meet child safety standards. We test every pushchair, cot and highchair for finger traps and our child car seat testing goes way beyond the industry standard - we crash test each seat in a front crash at 40mph and side crash at 18mph.'

Child Safety Week

Chief Executive of the Child Accident Prevention Trust Katrina Phillips comments: 'The findings are alarming. Many accidents that kill, injure or disable children don’t need to happen. With the help of professionals working with children and families, we can help families prevent serious accidents and tackle the problem head on.'

Along with the Child Accident Prevention Trust, Child Safety Week is running a number of events across the UK. There will be information guides and interactive games and puzzles to teach children about child safety, as well as a Big Taste Test to educate children to the dangers of eating harmful substances.

Simple tips to protect your child

Check out our list of easy adjustments that could make all the difference to your child's safety:

  • Ensure you have a safe car seat and that you are fitting it correctly.
  • Baby monitors ensure you can check the safety of your child.
  • Install a stair gate.
  • Get window locks and keep window keys accessible – but not to your child.
  • If you have a fireplace, get a fire guard that prevents the child from touching the fire, or throwing items into a fire. One with a curved top is best because it will act as a deterrent against placing objects on the fire guard. Radiator guards are also ideal for protecting your child from very hot radiators.
  • Audible smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms are essential devices for the safety of children and adults. These are widely available from DIY shops and should be checked regularly to ensure they are in working order.
  • If you don't have safety glass in areas your child can reach, such as patio doors, glass safety film can protect them if glass is shattered.
  • Doorstops or door slam stoppers can stop a child from trapping their fingers or getting shut in a room. 
  • Drawer and cupboard catches will prevent your child from getting to potentially harmful items, such as cleaning products or knives.
  • There are debates on whether socket covers that aim protect your child against electricity are necessary.