Hot Car Deal – Save £6,192 on BMW X1We’ve found big discounts on the BMW X1 off-roader

29 April 2014

IMPORTANT: Read the information at the bottom of this page before going ahead with any car purchase.

The BMW X1 is an upmarket off-roader with an equally upmarket price tag. However, if you’re happy to go for a low mileage, nearly new model you can find some huge discounts online.

BMW isn’t a company known for its bargain prices and the BMW X1 is no different. Shop around online though and you can find some much more appealing prices – especially if you’re open to a nearly-new model. Although some of these nearly-new models have as few as eight miles on the clock, they cost far less than they would brand new.

What this means is that you can save big on a car with just a handful of miles under its tyres, which will last just as long as a brand new model. Based on the popular 3 Series, the X1 handles corners well and won't let you down crossing a muddy field. The X1 offers several excellent diesel engines, which are both punchy and economical.

Try Which? for £1 to find out how close the X1 got to its official fuel economy figure in our more realistic test


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£3,414 discount on our Top Choice diesel BMW X1 20d SE

With a strong diesel engine under the bonnet and two-wheel drive, this X1 is both frugal and speedy. The X1 20d SE has an impressive claimed economy figure of 57.6mpg, yet it can still accelerate to 62mph in just 7.8 seconds. Don’t expect to venture too far off the beaten track without four-wheel drive though.

Thanks to a saving of £3,414 this X1 is available for £23,291 online. Standard equipment includes a digital radio, air conditioning, Bluetooth for connecting your phone to the car, 17-inch alloy wheels and rear parking sensors.

Save £6,192 on nearly-new BMW X1 with just eight miles on the clock

With a meagre eight miles under its wheels, this four-wheel drive X1 is really still factory fresh. However, as it’s listed as a used car you can save a substantial £6,192 on the list price – slashing the price to £20,988. It also comes with all the same equipment as the model above.

This diesel model returns an official economy figure of 51.4mpg and can get to 62mph in a reasonable 9.9 seconds. Thanks to the four-wheel drive system the car should take slippery surfaces in its stride. This X1 comes with black paint and a black interior.

£8,072 saving on 7,000-mile, four-wheel drive BMW X1

If you’d prefer a bit more power and style for your money, look no further than the BMW X1 xDrive 20d xLine. This car has four-wheel drive and a willing diesel motor. Claimed economy matches the model above, but performance is much stronger with this model sprinting to 62mph in just 8.1 seconds.

This car may have a few miles under its tyres, but the pay-off is a price tag of £21,988 – compared to a list price of over £30,000. In xLine specification standard kit matches the SE models above, but you also get leather upholstery, striking 18-inch alloy wheels, unique interior trim, roof rails and a leather multi-function steering wheel.

Hot Car Deals:

  • BMW X1 sDrive 20d SE - £23,291 at Carfile
  • BMW X1 xDrive 18d SE - £20,988 at Arnold Clark
  • BMW X1 xDrive 20d xLine - £21,988 at Arnold Clark

Hot Car Deal hunters please note:

  • The car brokers and deals featured are not vetted, endorsed or recommended by Which?. Always check the specifics of the deal so you know exactly what you are getting and who is supplying the car. Make sure all aspects of the deal are confirmed in writing before committing to buy.
  • Not all brokers deal in UK sourced vehicles, and this may have an impact on standard equipment and warranty levels.
  • The term ‘pre-reg’ or ‘pre-registered’ refers to vehicles that are brand new but already registered with the DVLA. This means that you will appear as the second owner on the V5 registration document. 
  • Beware of unscrupulous brokers who tell you they will have to retain the V5 registration document for a period of time after your purchase of the car. Vehicles sold this way may be cheap, but there are legal implications, including the risk that you the buyer could be committing a criminal offence when you drive the car, so they should be avoided.