Dyson launches new Pure Cool Link air purifierNew air purifier sends data to Dyson Link App

31 March 2016


The Dyson Pure Cool Link tower purifier (left) costs £100 more than the desk purifier version (right)

Dyson has unveiled its new Pure Cool Link air purifier. It's available as either a desk or tower purifier – costing a pricey £350 and £450 respectively. We went to the Dyson Pure Cool Link launch to discover its key selling points and take a look at it.

The Dyson Pure Cool Link claims to remove 99.95% of indoor allergens and other pollutants as small as 0.1 microns from the air – which includes tobacco smoke and ultrafine particles. Dyson claims that cleaner and cool air is then dispersed by the Pure Cool Link's fan.

Dyson also says that sensors inside the machine can identify changes in air conditions, then change the airflow to maintain the target air quality.

We haven't tested the Pure Cool Link, but we have put Dyson Hot and Cool electric heaters - which have a similarly stylish design - through our tough lab tests. Check out our electric heater reviews to find out which electric heaters you can rely on to keep your home warm.

Dyson Pure Cool Link air purifier features

The Pure Cool Link also claims to project cleaner air around the room quietly. If true, this means it shouldn’t disturb you too much if you put it in a room you like to relax in, such as your lounge.

It has an automatic night-time mode, which dims the LED display and is quieter than the standard setting, according to Dyson. Due to surrounding noise at the launch, it was quite difficult to get an impression of just how much quieter this mode was, but we thought the volume of the machine did drop.

Dyson says that you'll need to replace the filter once a year if the purifier is in action for 12 hours per day. A replacement filter will cost £50. The Dyson Pure Cool Link also comes with a two year parts and labour warranty.

The Dyson Link app – what you need to know

Dyson-Link-app 2

The Dyson Link App collects and stores air quality information passed to it by the purifier

You can send the air quality data the Pure Cool Link collects to an app on your smartphone or tablet.

The idea behind this is that you can remotely monitor the air quality inside your home, and set a new air quality target before it reaches 'very poor' levels.

The app - called Dyson Link - doesn't show you empirical data regarding the actual air quality of your home, but gives you a qualitative assessment of it. It can also plot historic data onto a graph, allowing you to find out when the peak pollution periods are.

You can also check the air quality in an outside location of your choice through the app. 

The Dyson Link app has been developed for iOS and Android operating systems. 

More on this...