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Want a simple phone? The Doro 6050 comes calling

The 6050 is one of Doro’s new simple mobile phones for 2017. But just how easy is it to use, and do its features justify its £75 price tag?

Not everyone’s in the market for a fancy smartphone packing in all of the latest tech. If you’re looking for something that’s easy to use, simple phones are just the ticket – and one of the biggest players in this market is Doro.

We’ve been hands on with the Doro 6050 – a new mobile phone aimed at over-65s – to find out just how well it does, and whether its features are genuinely useful, or best left alone. Could the Doro 6050 be the best simple mobile phone for 2017?

The Doro 6050 has a clamshell design. This means it has a lid that you can open and close, to reveal or hide the display. You may have heard similar handsets referred to as ‘flip phones’. If you’re looking for a simple phone with large and well-spaced buttons, this design is a good choice – with the keypad on a different surface than the display, there’s a bit more space for the buttons.

Read our Doro 6050 first look review for our full hands-on impressions. If you’re short on time, watch our Doro 6050 video. We recorded it at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in March 2017, when this new simple phone was announced.

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The Doro 6050’s displays – and the ‘action menu’.

The new Doro has a 2.8-inch screen, which is a fairly typical size for a clamshell phone. There’s an additional 1.3-inch screen on top of the phone’s lid. This shows you important details at a glance, such as who is calling you, the time, and text message notifications.

We like that the on-screen menu is clearly labelled. This is true of most simple mobile phones, but one feature we really like on the Doro 6050 is the option of an action-based menu.

By default, you’ll see options like ‘Phonebook’ and ‘Messages’ on the menu. However, you can change this so you’ll see categories like ‘Call’, which upon pressing gives you a few choices such as ‘Number’, ‘Contact’ and ‘Voice Mail’. We think this is really handy for those not especially confident with technology.

How long does the battery last?

Doro says the 6050 will last for up to six hours of continuous calls. It’s unlikely you’ll be talking for six hours straight, but a lot of phone manufacturers use this as a benchmark for battery life.

It’s also claimed to last for around 17.5 days on standby. This is worth bearing in mind if you want a mobile phone but you’re unlikely to use it that much – or if you’re looking for a handset to keep in the car in case of an emergency.

We can’t vouch for the 6050’s battery life yet. We assess both call time and standby time in our test lab – and we’ll be bringing you our full results in the first half of July.

Which extra features does the Doro 6050 have?

Doro has kitted out the 6050 with plenty of extra features, to try to make it the go-to simple mobile phone for 2017.

There’s a 3Mp camera on the back. It might not be the best digital camera replacement, but it could still be useful for the odd photo of friends and family.

There’s an assistance button on the back, too. Pressing this (and confirming that you need assistance) will fire off a message to pre-assigned contacts that you might need some help. This might be useful if you live alone and require urgent assistance.

It’s hearing-aid compatible, with the highest T4/M4 rating. This should mean that the hard-of-hearing should still be able to have clear phone conversations.

We like this phone’s torch function. There’s a quick-access button on the keypad that you press and hold to sustain the torch light. Alternatively, there’s a torch app that you access from the main menu, where you can press ‘on’ and it will stay that way until you press ‘off’.

Head to our full Doro 6050 first look review for more information and insight about the 6050’s features. We also reveal our thoughts on whether it could reach the dizzying heights of Best Buy stardom.

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