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Which? tests HP Pavilion laptops after battery recall

New HP models follow fire-risk warning on older series

Laptop brand HP was forced to recall its Pavilion-series earlier in the year, after warning the models could cause potential ‘fire and burn hazards’. The new and improved HP Pavilion 15 and 17 have now passed through our test labs – can they repair the reputation of the Pavilion series?

Following HP’s recall announcement, we elected to make the HP Pavilion series ineligible for a Best Buy award. The company issued a recall of batteries due to safety concerns. The affected models were the Pavilion 14, 15 and 17-inch lines sold between March 2013 and October 2016.

We’ve been in contact with HP, who assure us that the recently tested HP Pavilion 15 and Pavilion 17 are in the clear and have none of the risks of the older generation models. But are they good enough to earn a Best Buy award? Find out in our full reviews of the HP Pavilion 15 and the HP Pavilion 17

Laptops on test this month

The latest laptops to pass through the Which? labs come with a wide range of price tags, from under £200 to nearly £1,000. They also come with equally varying test scores.

We’ve tested laptops from stalwarts such as Dell, Asus and Lenovo, as well as an HP Pavilion model. While we’ve uncovered two Best Buys, we’ve also discovered some less inspiring models that you’ll want to avoid.

HP Pavilion 17 (7th gen), £900

With the latest i5 Intel processor, a 1.2TB hard drive, 128GB solid state drive and a dedicated NVIDIA graphics processor, not to mention that whopping 17-inch screen, the HP Pavilion 17 packs plenty of punch on paper.

With these specs you’ll be able to breeze through daily tasks, photo/video editing, and even a little gaming in your downtime, but how did it do in our labs? Find out in the full review of this HP Pavilion 17.

Acer Aspire ES1 11.6, £180

At the other end of the laptop spectrum is the new Acer Aspire ES1 11.6, which marries its small screen with a small price tag. An Intel Celeron processor and 4GB of Ram are about what you’d expect for the money, and while it’s not going to satisfy those who need to run demanding software, it could be a decent option for students or casual users.

The 32GB storage space will soon be taken up with snaps and apps, but it’s a small concession for the asking price. To read how it did in our lab test, head to our full review of the Acer Aspire ES1 11.6.

Asus Chromebook C302ca, £530

This Chromebook might seem a little pricier than most, but it’s clear that Asus is pitching it as a premium option, from the specs under the hood to the styling, which, dare we say it, is almost Apple-esque.

A 2-1 laptop, the screen can be folded back on itself to act as a tablet, for when you don’t need the full laptop experience. Running Google’s own operations system and relying on the cloud, rather than the traditional Windows set up, it might not be for everyone, but for the initiated, can this Chromebook make the grade? Find out in our full review of the Asus Chromebook C302ca.

Full list of laptops from our recent tests

To find out which laptops come top in our tests, browse our Best Buy laptops.

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