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Nutribullet blenders compared

By Jane Darling

Which Nutribullet blender is right for you? We explain what you get with each model and which Nutribullet did best in our tough tests.

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If you're keen to jump on the Nutribullet bandwagon, but aren't sure which Nutribullet blender to buy, we have the essential information you need to choose the right blender for your lifestyle and budget.

On this page you can compare the key features of each Nutribullet, including capacity, weight and power, and get an overview of the pros and cons of each model.

Alternatively, you can head straight to our Nutribullet blender reviews to see how the Nutribullets compare when we put them to the test, including which is quietest, quickest and which makes the best smoothies.

To see how rival models - including cheap Nutribullet alternatives - compare, head to our blender reviews.

Nutribullet blenders - what's the difference?

There are five models to choose from, ranging from the original Nutribullet 600, which we've found for as little as £40, up to the top-of-the-range Nutribullet Rx, which costs more like £170. 

Each blender comes with an assortment of different-sized blending cups with sports lids to convert them into travel mugs, and a recipe book. The Nutribullet 600 and 900 are both available with different-sized accessory packs, so if you want additional beakers or lids, you can opt for a bumper pack at a slightly higher price.

As you go up the range you get more features and extra blending capacity. The Nutribullet Rx, 1000 series and 1200 series blenders can make several portions in one go. The Rx can also make hot soup from scratch in less than 10 minutes, while the 1000 and 1200 series include an insulated stainless-steel travel cup designed to keep your smoothies ice-cold when you're out and about.

Nutribullet 600, £60

  • Capacity - 0.6 litres
  • Weight - 2kg
  • Features - 600W motor, one speed setting, two blades (wet/dry), one large plastic blending cup, two 0.3-litre blending cups,  two comfort rings (for drinking), two lids. Available in grey, black, white or red. All dishwasher safe except blades

The Nutribullet 600 is the smallest and quietest of the Nutribullet family. If you don't want to spend too much, but want the convenience of a personal blender, this popular little model might be just the ticket. But does the less powerful motor mean that it can't handle hard or fibrous ingredients? Or is it the original and the best?

Find out whether the original Nutribullet blender lives up to the hype - get the official verdict in the full Nutribullet 600 review.

Nutribullet Pro 900, £75

  • Capacity - 0.7 litres (measured. Stated capacity a little over 0.9 litres)
  • Weight - 2.6kg
  • Features - 900W motor, one speed setting, two blades (wet/dry), two tall plastic blending cups, one smaller blending cup, various lids and several lips with handles. All dishwasher safe except blades. Large hardback book filled with recipes and information about health and wellbeing

The Nutribullet 900 is a step up in terms of power and capacity from its little brother, the 600. However, it's also a significant step up in terms of price. It's claimed to create less aeration and therefore give its blends a purer consistency. If you want a bit more room to play with, and are comforted by the idea of more power behind the blades, this blender could be tempting.

We've found that more power doesn't always equal a better blend. Before you splash out, discover whether this Nutribullet is worth the extra investment by reading our detailed Nutribullet Pro 900 review.

Nutribullet Rx, £169

  • Capacity - 1.3 litres
  • Weight - 3.8kg
  • Features - 1,700W motor, one speed setting, one blade (plus blade remover), one tall plastic blending cup ('souperblast pitcher'), two additional blending/drinking cups, comfort lip ring (for drinking), travel lids, heating element for making hot soup from scratch. Everything dishwasher safe except blade. A hardback recipe book and blade-cleaning brush also supplied

Much more powerful  than its siblings, the Nutribullet Rx could be a great choice if you want to get on board with 2016's 'souping' trend. It has a built-in heating element that lets you cook hot soup from scratch in seven minutes. 

It's a weighty blender - not far off 4kg - and is tall, too, at 47cm when the biggest blending cup is in position. Moving it around is cumbersome, so you'd probably want to make room for it on your kitchen worktop. The extra accessories mean you'll need some spare cupboard space, too.

It's a premium price for a blender, so is it worth it? Find out in the full Nutribullet Rx review.

Nutribullet 1000 Series, £99

  • Capacity - 0.9 litres
  • Weight - 2.8g
  • Features - 1,000W motor, one speed setting, features 'Smart Technology', designed to adapt automatically to the type of ingredients being blended, two blending cups: 930ml plastic cup and an 820ml insulated stainless-steel cup, one lid with flip-top for drinking on the move

The Nutribullet 1000 Series launched towards the end of 2016, along with the 1200 series blender. It's the first Nutribullet to offer an insulated blending cup as part of the deal. The double-wall stainless steel cup is designed to keep your drinks cool on-the-go. The 1000 series has a bigger motor than the original Nutribullet 600, but you may find the larger cups a bit oversized for carrying around. 

The Nutribullet 1200 Series is a more premium version of the 1000 series, with a more powerful 1,200W motor and an extra blending cup with handle.

Find out how we rated these new additions to the Nutribullet line up in the Nutribullet 1000 Series and Nutribullet 1200 series reviews.

Which Nutribullet is best?

Which Nutribullet is right for you depends on how much you want to spend, and whether you just want to make speedy single-portion smoothies or a wider range of drinks, snacks and soups. Nutribullet blenders are pricier than a lot of rivals, so you'll want to be sure your money is well spent, too. 

We've put the all five Nutribullet blenders through our independent lab tests, so you can easily compare them using our Nutribullet blender reviews. We challenged each blender to tackle tough ingredients, such as leafy greens, ginger and ice, as well as nuts and frozen berries, so you know whether they'll handle the demands of your daily smoothie.

We also assess how good they are at whipping up soup, crushing ice and blending drier mixes, such as pesto. And it's not just the blend that matters. We'll tell you if they are excessively noisy or tricky to clean, so your path to smoothie nirvana is as smooth as it can be. Find out more about how we test blenders.

Cheap Nutribullet alternatives

Nutribullet might be the biggest name in blending, but there are alternatives worth considering if you're put off by the price; including less well-known models that do a better job of blending, and cheaper options that score well and offer great value for money.

Browse our blender reviews to find the best model for your budget.

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