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Which travel system pushchair should you buy in 2020?

We’ve tested and reviewed the latest 3-in-1 travel systems from Baby Jogger, Babystyle, Micralite, Quinny and Stokke

Which travel system pushchair should you buy in 2020?

We’ve just tested and reviewed 16 of the latest single and double travel system pushchairs.

These 3-in-1 pushchairs range in price from £200 all the way up to £1,000 for a travel system pushchair and carrycot.

A complete travel system package is an expensive purchase, especially as in most cases you’ll have to shell out a further few hundred pounds for a compatible baby car seat.

Read on to find out how these recently tested pushchairs compare, so you don’t waste your money, and to see whether we uncovered any issues while testing them.


Or go straight to our travel system pushchair reviews and best baby car seat reviews to find the right 3-in-1 set-up for transporting your baby.


Babystyle Hybrid Edge 2

The Babystyle Hybrid Edge 2 is a single-to-double convertible travel system pushchair.

This means it can be used as a single or a double buggy, and with carrycots or car seats in place of the seat or seats.

PROS:

  • Height adaptors (raises the seat to table level when used as a single and creates more room between seats in double mode)
  • Compatible with Maxi-Cosi and BeSafe seats
  • One-pull harness (similar to car seats – simply pull a strap at the bottom to adjust the tightness)
  • Comes with raincover

CONS:

  • Multi car seat adaptors sold separately (£25)
  • No shopping basket when used as a double
  • Folding mechanism is under the seat at the front
  • Seat is only suitable for 6+ months

We’ve tested it as a stroller, as a travel system with a carrycot and car seat, as well as in tandem double pushchair mode.

It costs £499 for the Babystyle Hybrid Edge 2 stroller, £648 for the Babystyle Hybrid Edge 2 with carrycot and £678 to buy the Babystyle Hybrid Edge 2 as a tandem double. Read each review to see how it scored in that mode.

Stokke Beat

Typically, most travel systems have a maximum child weight of 15kg, which is around three years old, but the Stokke Beat is a travel system pushchair that can be used from birth until 22kg, which is about five years old.

The seat can recline far enough back so that it’s suitable for babies under six months old, which means you don’t necessarily have to use a car seat or carrycot for it to be used from birth.

It’s certainly not cheap though. It will set you back £520 for the Stokke Beat on its own, or £719 if you opt for a package that includes the Stokke Beat carrycot.

PROS:

CONS:

  • Raincover sold separately (£29)
  • Stokke Stroller CSA Multi car seat adaptors sold separately (£42)
  • Seat is a little small
  • Jerky hood

Take a look at the Stokke Beat review and the Stokke Beat travel system review for more information.

Baby Jogger City Mini 2

We first tested the Baby Jogger City Mini 2 in 2015 and we decided to bring this popular model back into the lab following a few updates.

The City Mini 2 is a three-wheeled travel system pushchair that’s suitable to be used from birth, because the seat reclines to more than 150 degrees.

You can purchase a range of add-on accessories for the City Mini 2, including a carrycot, footmuff, ‘glider board’ (toddler platform), ‘parent console’ (storage pouch) and a pushchair tray for your child’s snacks and toys.

It’s reasonably priced, at £269 for the Baby Jogger City Mini 2 or £449 for the pushchair with carrycot.

PROS:

  • Large hood provides good coverage
  • Compatible with City Go i-Size car seat by Baby Jogger or Maxi-Cosi car seats
  • Maximum seat weight is 22kg (about five years old)
  • No need to remove the seat unit before attaching the cot or car seat

CONS:

  • Forward-facing only
  • Handlebar isn’t adjustable
  • Small foot brake
  • City Go i-Size and Maxi-Cosi car seat adaptors sold separately (£29)

Read the full Baby Jogger City Mini 2 review and the Baby Jogger City Mini 2 travel system review for further details.

Micralite TwoFold

The Micralite TwoFold is a unique-looking single-to-double convertible travel system pushchair.

It has an extending wheelbase that can be used as a ride-on board for pre-schoolers to stand on or to house the sizeable 40-litre shopping bag.

It’s also where a rear seat for a second child can be attached, or you can swap the seat for the Micralite AirFlow carrycot or a baby car seat.

At the time of writing, a TwoFold bundle is half price on the Micralite website, and for £595 it includes the pushchair with built-in rider board, carrycot, two seat units, car seat adaptors, footmuff, raincover, 40-litre bag and tyre pump.

But before buying we’d recommend reading our review of the Micralite TwoFold as a pushchair, as well as the Micralite TwoFold travel system review and Micralite TwoFold double review.

PROS:

CONS:

  • Forward-facing only
  • Quite heavy
  • Hard to access the small shopping basket
  • BeSafe and Maxi-Cosi car seat adaptors sold separately (£40)

Quinny VNC

The Quinny VNC has an unusual textured rubber handlebar, a distinctive chassis and large shopping basket.

Our parent testers liked the UPF 50 hood because it covers your child from the sun and it has a handy viewing window so you can check on your little one.

It’s available in dark grey, bright blue or purple and comes with a range of accessories, including car seat adaptors, a cup holder, parasol clip and bumper bar.

For £579 you can get the Quinny VNC, or for £778 you can get the Quinny VNC travel system with Quinny Hux carrycot (£200 when sold separately).

PROS:

  • Large, easy-to-access shopping basket
  • One-hand fold
  • Compatible with Maxi-Cosi car seats.
  • Comes with lots of accessories, including car seat adaptors

CONS:

  • Must remove seat before folding
  • Need to attach two sets of adaptors for both the carrycot and the car seat
  • Quinny Hux carrycot is expensive
  • Bulky when folded

Read our Quinny VNC review and Quinny VNC travel system review.

If you still haven’t seen your perfect travel system pushchair, visit our guide to choosing the best travel system for our top 10 best travel system pushchairs on test, as well as tips and advice on the best features to look out for.

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