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Chicago Town, Dr Oetker and Goodfella’s beaten by cheap supermarket pepperoni pizza in Which? taste test

Just one own-label frozen pizza was judged good enough to be named a Best Buy

Chicago Town, Dr Oetker and Goodfella’s beaten by cheap supermarket pepperoni pizza in Which? taste test

Save money on your dinner this weekend by steering clear of expensive big brands and choosing our Best Buy supermarket pizza instead.

To find out which pepperoni pizza packs the perfect slice, our panel of more than 60 tasters tucked into freshly baked pizzas from Chicago Town, Dr Oetker and Goodfella’s, as well as seven supermarket own-brands, including Asda, Lidl, Sainsbury’s and more.

Only one supermarket pizza, costing less than half the price of branded options, was named a Best Buy. While two other affordable own-label pizzas weren’t far behind.

But not all supermarket options delivered on the day. Our worst-rated pizza was also an own-brand and our panel called out its weak-tasting tomato sauce and lack of cheesiness.

What’s on a pepperoni pizza?

Pepperoni pizza with herbs

Most pepperoni pizzas are topped with cheese, tomato sauce and, unsurprisingly, pepperoni. But our research reveals that the type and quantity of the meat toppings really does vary between brands.

Several of the products we tested were labelled as double or even triple pepperoni pizzas. To most of us this would suggest more meat, but the number actually refers to the types of pepperoni rather than the quantity.

For example, Dr Oetker’s single pepperoni pizza has a higher percentage of meat (13%) than Lidl’s, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s double pepperoni pizzas (around 11%).

Iceland’s triple pepperoni pizza, however, delivers on both quantity and variety – it’s topped with 15% meat, including mini pepperoni, regular-sized smoked pepperoni and spicy pepperoni.


Find out which brands offer the most meat in our guide to the best pepperoni pizza


Tips for cooking, cutting and serving pizza

Slicing a pepperoni pizza

Get the most out of your frozen pizza with these simple serving tips.

  • Redistribute toppings before cooking Take a few moments to spread out the toppings before you pop it in the oven. Once it’s cooked, the sausage won’t be so easy to move without pulling off the cheese and burning your fingers.
  • Cook directly on the oven rack If you like a crispy base, avoid using a baking tray. Instead, place the pizza directly on to the oven shelf and put a tray underneath to catch any bits that fall off.
  • Leave the pizza to cool for a few minutes before slicing This will stop the hot cheese from coming away from the base when you’re cutting it.
  • Use a pizza wheel These handy kitchen gadgets aren’t just a gimmick – they really do make slicing a pizza much easier.
  • Cut equal sized slices This won’t be for everyone but if you like to be exact when it comes to cutting your pizza, here’s how to do it. Divide 360 by the number of slices you want, then use a protractor to get the exact angle you need to cut at. For example, if you need six slices, 360 divided by six is 60, so you need to slice every 60 degrees.
  • How much is a serving? All but one of the pizzas we tested were recommended as serving two people. If half a pizza doesn’t feel like enough, serve with a side salad or some potato wedges.

Fancy making pizza from scratch? See our guide to the best pizza ovens


How we tested pepperoni pizza

Dr Oetker, Goodfella's and Chicago Town pepperoni pizza boxes

We tested 10 frozen pepperoni pizzas including branded and supermarket own-label options.

We served the pizzas blind to a panel of 65 tasters to rate. They assessed them in a private booth, rating the taste, texture, appearance and aroma of each one.

The overall score is based on: 

  • 50% flavour 
  • 20% appearance
  • 15% aroma
  • 15% texture 
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