Tax rates, allowances and amounts How to calculate your tax bill

Tax basics

Work out the portion of your income you'll pay tax on

Calculating your tax bill does not necessarily have to be too complicated. 

Here we provide a step-by-step guide to working out how much tax you have to pay.

Non-savings income

The first step is to work out the portion of your income you need to pay tax on.

Add together your non-savings income from various sources, including employment, self-employment, freelance work, pensions, rental income and taxable state benefits. Ignore any tax-free income such as interest from cash Isas

Don't include income from savings and investments at this stage, as they are taken into account later.

Deduct tax reliefs

Now deduct any tax reliefs that you are entitled to such as: 

  • Pension contributions made through your employer's pension scheme (but not any contributions made to personal or stakeholder schemes, as relief for these contributions is given later in the income tax calculation)
  • Qualifying loan interest payments, or 
  • Gifts to charities paid through a payroll giving scheme (but not through Gift Aid).

Deduct allowances

Following this, deduct any full-rate allowances you are entitled to, for example, personal allowance and blind person's allowance.

Taxable income

The figure you are left with is the non-savings part of the taxable income on which you will pay tax. For 2014-15 the first £31,865 will be taxed at 20%. Anything left above this amount will be taxed at 40%, unless it exceeds £150,000, in which case it will be taxed at 45%. 

Savings and dividend income

Once you have split your non-savings income into bands, you can work out how much tax you need to pay on the amount you earn from savings and investments.

Savings income that comes to £2,880 or less in 2014-15).  

Any savings income that comes to £2,880 (£2,790 for 2013-14) or less when added to your non-savings income will be taxed at 10%.

Savings income between £2,880 and £31,865 in 2014-15 (2013-14 limits are £2,790 and £32,010 respectively).

Any savings income that comes to between £2,880 and £31,865 (£2,790 and £32,010 in 2013-14) when added to your non-savings income will be taxed at 20%.

Savings income above £31,865 in 2014-15 (2013-14 limit is £32,010).

Any savings income that comes to more than £31,865 when added to your non-savings income will be taxed at 40%, unless it exceeds £150,000, in which case it will be taxed at 45% .

In April 2015, the 10% savings band will be abolished and instead a £5,000 tax-free savings band applied. This is in addition to tax-free personal allowance, which for 2015-16 will be £10,500.  

UK dividend income less than £31,865 in 2014-15

Any UK dividend income that comes to £31,865 (£32,010 in 2013-14) or less when added to non-savings income and savings income will be taxed at 10% (offset by a tax credit of 10% when you receive the dividend, meaning no further tax will be payable).

UK dividend income above £31,865 in 2014-15. (2013-14 limit is £32,010).

Any UK dividend income that comes to more than £31,865 (£32,010 in 2013-14) when added to non-savings income and savings income will be taxed at 32.5% (taking into account the 10% tax credit, the effective tax you pay on the dividend you receive will be 25%). If it comes to more than £150,000, it will be taxed at 37.5%. 

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