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Best mobility scooters

We've tested the best mobility scooters from CareCo, Pride, Livewell and more to find out which offers the smoothest, comfiest and most convenient ride
Joel Bates

The best mobility scooters are thoughtfully designed, comfortable, easy to control and smooth to drive.

In May 2022, we tested collapsible mobility scooters, folding mobility scooters and bestsellers from CareCo, Abilize, I-Go and more to see which is best for comfort, driving experience and technical ability.

Which? members told us they're interested in top mobility scooters at the cheaper end of what's available, so we focused on Class 2 mobility scooters that are only for use on pavements and indoors. They're much cheaper to buy than Class 3 road-legal mobility scooters. Several we tested cost less than £1,000.

Along with our test results below, you can find our advice on getting help with the cost of buying a good mobility scooter, which types you can buy, and commonly asked questions around insurance, registration, storage and servicing.

Prices and availability last checked: 2 August 2022.


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Best mobility scooters

We found major differences in the mobility scooters we tested, especially in terms of handling, comfort, and how much they vibrate when driven over bumpy surfaces.

Only logged-in Which? members can view the best mobility scooters test results.

If you're not yet a member, you'll see an alphabetically ordered list of the mobility scooters we tested. Join Which? now to get instant access to our test results and Best Buy recommendations below.

Abilize Stride Sport

Only available at CareCo: £989.99 (with VAT relief), £1,187.99 (with VAT)

Size and weight: 89 x 59 x 112cm (HxWxD), 55kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 17 miles range, 12 hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 136kg weight limit, swivel seat, 5.2cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

The Abilize Stride Sport collapses into five parts to make it easier to store in the boot of your car. 

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and see how we rated it.

CareCo AirLite X Travel Mobility Scooter

Only available at CareCo: £599.99 (with VAT relief), £719.99 (with VAT)

Size and weight: 82 x 49 x 101cm (HxWxD), 41kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately seven miles range, eight hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 115kg weight limit, swivel seat, 5cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

This is one of the cheapest mobility scooters we tested, but it does lack a few features you might expect, such as armrests.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and see how we rated it.

Drive Envoy 4 Mobility Scooter

Cheapest price: £1,349 (with VAT relief), £1,618 (with VAT) at Livewell, also available at Mobility Smart

Size and weight: 102 x 60 x 121cm (HxWxD), 94kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 30 miles range, 12 hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: No

Other key features: Air-filled tyres, 160kg weight limit, swivel seat, wing mirror, 6cm ground clearance, headlight

This is the only mobility scooter we tested that isn't collapsible, so you won't be able to store it in a car boot for transportation. Our results reveal if we still think it's a good scooter for sticking to the pavements in your local area.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and instantly see how we rated this mobility scooter. 

I-Go Vertex Sport

I-Go Vertex Sport mobility scooter

Only available at CareCo£999.99 (with VAT relief), £1,199.99 (with VAT)

Size and weight: 94 x 49.5 x 108cm (HxWxD), 57.5kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 15 miles range, 10 hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 130kg weight limit, swivel seat, 7cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

The I-Go Vertex Sport has the highest ground clearance of the mobility scooters we tested, which should reduce the chances of bumps in the ground scraping the underside of the scooter. We tested it on uneven concrete among other surfaces to see how it coped.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and instantly see how we rated this mobility scooter. 

Livewell Jaunt

Cheapest price: £539.10 (with VAT relief), £646.92 (with VAT) at Livewell, also available at Amazon

Size and weight: 89 x 56 x 102cm (HxWxD), 48kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 10 miles range, eight hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 136kg weight limit, swivel seat, 4cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

We drove all the mobility scooters we tested, including this Livewell Jaunt, up an increasingly steep test slope to find out how they coped with climbing hills and if any gave up as the incline grew. 

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and see how we rated this mobility scooter. 

Pride Go Go Elite Traveller

Cheapest price: £849.95 (with VAT relief), £1,019.94 (with VAT) at Mobility Smart, also available at Mobility Solutions

Size and weight: 101.6 x 48.56 x 100.96cm (HxWxD), 35.50kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 10 miles range, eight hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 124kg weight limit, 6.3cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

We found the Pride Go Go Elite Traveller's seat comfortable to sit on, but there's plenty more we took into account when deciding if we think you should buy it.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and instantly see how we rated this mobility scooter. 

TGA Minimo Folding Mobility Scooter

Cheapest price: £1,649.95 (with VAT relief), £1,979.94 (with VAT) at Mobility Smart, also available at Mobility World, TGA Mobility

Size and weight: 96 x 54 x 96cm (HxWxD), 28kg

Battery range and charging time: Approximately 12 miles range, eight hours charging time

Max speed: 4mph

Collapsible: Yes

Other key features: Solid tyres, 115kg weight limit, 6cm ground clearance, anti-tip stabiliser wheels

The TGA Minimo is the only mobility scooter we tested that folds down into a compact shape instead of collapsing into several bits. It's also the lightest scooter we tested – but is it the best?

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

How we tested mobility scooters

We lined up some of the UK's most popular Class 2 mobility scooters to test out and review and consulted mobility charities on the most important aspects to test. 

We paid for every mobility scooter we tested and bought them anonymously so you can be confident our results are independent..

Ease of set up, disassembly, and portability

We collapsed and assembled all of the mobility scooters we tested, considering how long it took, how obviously and easily the different parts fitted together, and how easily they might fit into the back of a car for transportation.

Comfort, adjustment and charging

We adjusted each of the mobility scooters and considered how easily the seat and armrests could be customised, how straightforward it was to get on and off each scooter, and how easily the scooter's battery could be plugged in for charging.

Driving experience

We drove each of the mobility scooters indoors, and on even and uneven concrete outdoors, to judge how smooth and controlled they are.

We carried out manoeuvres as well as sharp turns, reversing, and going over bumps in the path. We all rated how effectively each mobility scooter minimised vibration and how easily the controls could be handled and understood.

We also tested the stopping distance of the scooters when braking on a slope, but found that none of them were bad enough to criticise for this.

Slopes and hill starts

To find out how the mobility scooters we tested handle hills, we drove each one up the famous Test Hill at the Brooklands Museum, which gets increasingly steep the higher you go, and recorded the steepest gradient each could handle before giving up and switching off.

We also tried hill starts on the Test Hill with each mobility scooter.

Read our expert advice on staying independent at home.

Can I get help with the cost of a mobility scooter?

Couple out on mobility scooters

Yes, you can reduce the cost of buying a mobility scooter through government grants, tax discounts and assistance from charities. Below are the three main options:

  • VAT relief - If you’re disabled or have a long-term illness, you may be eligible for VAT relief, which cuts VAT from the cost of your scooter and makes it cheaper to buy. Most suppliers offer VAT relief prices if you provide a completed self-declaration form from Gov.uk.
  • Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - if you have difficulty getting around and handling everyday activities, you can get a scooter on PIP payments from the government. You'll receive a monthly benefit that can be put towards buying a mobility scooter. The PIP page on Gov.uk has all the info on how much you can get and how to apply.
  • Charities - if you're wondering how do you get a free mobility scooter in the UK, charities such as the Mobility Trust will endeavour to help you if you'll struggle to pay. While you may not be able to get your mobility scooter entirely for free, many charities will aim to at least make a contribution to the cost if you need help.

Motability also offers more wallet-friendly routes into owning a mobility scooter, such as leasing a scooter and using a mobility allowance. Read: Hiring a mobility scooter and Motability to see what the options are.


What type of mobility scooter should I buy?

Mobility scooters for the pavement (Class 2)

Class 2 mobility scooters can be driven on pavements and indoor areas such as shops and museums.

They're often cheaper and smaller than road scooters, so if you don't live too far from wherever you need to get to and can get around on pavements, a Class 2 scooter is probably for you.

Most Class 2 scooters have a maximum speed of 4mph, as that's the legal speed limit for pavements.

Mobility scooters for the road (Class 3)

Road-legal mobility scooters are known as Class 3 vehicles, and are generally larger, heavier and more expensive than Class 2 scooters.

Class 3 mobility scooters are allowed on the road, except for motorways or dual carriageways, and they have a maximum speed of 8mph. They can be driven on the pavement too at a 4mph speed limit.

Class 3 mobility scooters generally have more powerful motors and batteries than Class 2, so they're better-suited to longer journeys and steeper hills. They also have front and rear lights, indicators, hazard lights, a rear-view mirror and a horn.

Although you don't need to have a licence or pay vehicle tax on a mobility scooter, class 3 scooters need to be registered with the DVLA. The retailer you buy your Class 3 scooter from will usually arrange this, but if you need to register a scooter or change the registration details, Gov.uk has the information you need.

Boot scooters and folding scooters

Smaller Class 2 scooters that can be folded or taken apart for transportation in the back of a car are often called 'boot scooters'. As with all class 2 scooters, they're only suitable for use on pavements and indoors.

Some stay as one whole unit but can be folded down to a more compact size, and others can be dismantled into several parts which will then need reassembling when back out of the car.

Although it's handy to be able to go further afield on your Class 2 scooter by sticking it in the boot of a car, boot scooters do come with some compromises. They're often still heavy to carry, are usually less comfortable due to smaller seats and armrests, and tend to have smaller (and therefore less powerful) batteries.


If you have a registered disability or another significant health or mobility issue, head to our Blue Badge guide to see if you're entitled to a Blue Badge parking permit.


Mobility scooters FAQs

Mobility scooter driving down a street
  • Where can I drive my mobility scooter? - Class 2 scooters are for pavements and indoors only, and Class 3 scooters can drive on roads, too. However, don't assume that mobility scooters are allowed in every shopping area. Businesses might have concerns that your scooter might get stuck in a tight space or block a pathway, and can prohibit their use.
  • Do I need tax, registration and insurance for my mobility scooter? - You don't have to pay vehicle tax, but you do need to register Class 3 scooters with the DVLA and display a ‘nil value’ tax disc. You'll need to fill in a V55/4 form for new vehicles or a V55/5 form for used vehicles. It's not required for you to insure your scooter, but it's recommended.
  • Do I need to service my mobility scooter? - It's recommended that you get your mobility scooter routinely serviced once a year, and whenever you notice changes in performance or odd noises. Regular servicing might also be a requirement of your insurance policy if you have one. It usually costs between £50 and £90, and you're best having it done at home or at a registered mobility centre. That way you can avoid extra costs being added on for repairs you don't need.
  • How do I store and secure my mobility scooter? - Leaving it out in the elements is likely to lead to damage, so we'd recommend storing your scooter inside, at least in a shed or garage if you don't have space for it in your home. If you do have to store it outside, you're best off buying a cover to help protect it. For security, most scooters have a key to start the ignition, but you can use a wheel clamp, lock, or get a scooter alarm fitted if you want extra peace of mind.

For more assistance with mobility at home, see our guide on buying adjustable beds.