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Best personal finance software

Find out how we test personal finance software and discover which packages are the best at helping you manage your money. 

In this article
What is personal finance software? Why use personal finance software? How to choose personal finance software Video guide: What makes Best Buy personal finance software?
Personal finance software reviewed

What is personal finance software?

Personal finance software can help you manage your bank accounts, credit cards and investments, as well as your income and expenditure, from your laptop, computer or even your mobile phone.

We have put seven leading packages – You Need A Budget, Moneydance, Buxfer, Banktivity, AceMoneyBankTree and Home Accountz – through comprehensive testing to help you find the right one for your needs.

Members can log in to see the results of our personal finance software analysis. If you’re not already a member, you can sign up to a two-month trial for Which? Money for just £1 to access this review and enjoy the benefits of a Which? membership.

Why use personal finance software?

Most paid-for personal finance software packages, which typically cost between £30 and £50, allow you to keep on top of your personal and household finances.

They do this by by pulling in or allowing you to upload information from your bank accounts, credit cards and investments. 

They also let you plan budgets and analyse your incomings and outgoings by setting reminders, creating charts, generating graphs and running reports that can help you keep on top of your money and plan for the future.

How to choose personal finance software

The top personal finance software packages all come with a fee, ongoing subscription costs or extra fees for better features so it can be hard to decide which one is best your financial needs.

To help you pick we put seven of the leading packages - You Need A BudgetMoneydance, Buxfer, Banktivity, AceMoneyBankTree and Home Accountz – to the test.

In our personal finance software reviews, we look at how easy it is to input data, generate reports and set reminders as well as compare safety features and rate the support functions available for these complex tools.

Video guide: What makes Best Buy personal finance software?

Watch our video to find out what to look out for when you're buying personal finance software.

Personal finance software reviewed

Members can log in to see the results of our personal finance software analysis. If you’re not already a member, you can sign up to a two-month trial for Which? Money for just £1 to access this review and enjoy the benefits of a Which? membership.

Software Price Version
tested

 

Which?
test score

 

Performance

 

Support

 

Mobile
app
Investment 
tracking
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail 77%

4 out of 5

5 out of 5

5 out of 5

No
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail 72%

4 out of 5

3 out of 5

4 out of 5

Yes
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail 72%

4 out of 5

5 out of 5

3 out of 5

Yes
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail 67%

4 out of 5

4 out of 5

4 out of 5

Yes
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail

 

67%

4 out of 5

5 out of 5

3 out of 5

No
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail 62%

4 out of 5

3 out of 5

4 out of 5

Yes
Logged out detail Logged out detail Logged out detail

 

56%

3 out of 5

4 out of 5

4 out of 5

Yes

 

Tests for Buxfer, You Need A Budget, Banktivity, BankTree and Moneydance took place in May 2018.

The test results for Home Accountz and Ace Money are unchanged from April/May 2017 (the last time we tested these packages) as the software has not been updated.

One thing to note. Some personal finance software packages may state in marketing materials that they can link to bank accounts to import data.

In practice, currently, very few banks outside the United States are able to connect directly to personal finance software.