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Which barbecue is better? Napoleon Rogue v Weber Genesis

There’s still plenty of summer left and BBQ prices are being discounted

If you’re in the market for a barbecue, you can grab a great deal as retailers such as John Lewis slash prices.

The bank holiday might have been a washout but, with temperatures predicted to soar again next week, there’s still plenty of barbecue time left. Now’s the time to make the most of shops pushing their autumn merchandise and shifting their summer stock. You can grab a great deal on a high-end barbecue if you shop strategically.

The Genesis II 310 from popular barbecue brand Weber is sold out in many places. But the Napoleon Rogue – it’s direct competitor that’s already a couple of hundred pounds cheaper – is still available in shops and on sale in some places. 

Below we look at the differences and similarities between these two gas barbecues.

Find out if the model you’re considering is a dud or a bargain by checking our Best Buy barbecue reviews.

Weber Genesis II E-310 GBS gas barbecue, £799

The Genesis II 310 is a three-burner gas grill made by Weber, one of the biggest and most popular barbecue brands.

This year’s version of the Genesis is a high-spec and sturdily built grill with plenty of useful features. These include:

  • an open car design with shelves for storing items and cookware
  • two convenient side shelves for placing items down when you’re cooking
  • handy hooks for your cooking tools
  • fold-down shelves to make storing your grill easier
  • porcelain-enamelled ‘flavorizer’ bars for covering the three gas burners. These are designed to increase the cooking performance of the grill
  • a porcelain-enamelled lid with a temperature gauge and warming rack. 

To see more details, including how well it cooks and how easy it is to clean, head over to the full Weber Genesis II E-310 gas barbecue review.

Napoleon Rogue 425, £599

Made by Canadian brand Napoleon, the Rogue is very similar in look and design to the Genesis. This is the first year we’ve included Napoleon grills in our test. We put both the Rogue and the charcoal PRO-22K through their paces in our lab. 

Both grills are extremely high-spec and good quality. The Rogue has some minor differences in its construction, but most of the same features: 

  • While the Genesis has an open cart, the Rogue has a door that will neatly conceal any items you want to store under it.
  • The Rogue’s two side tables fold down for easy storage.
  • One of the side tables has hooks for you to hand your grilling tools.
  • The Rogue features stainless steel sear plates – Napoleon’s answer to Weber’s flavorizer bars.
  • The cooking grate of porcelain-enamel is in a wave pattern to increase the efficiency of heat distribution when cooking.
  • The Rogue also features a porcelain-enamelled lid with temperature gauge and warming rack.

While the Rogue and Genesis look and sound remarkably similar, does the £200 difference equal a difference in grilling prowess?

To find out how it fared in our tests, check out the Napoleon Rogue 425 review.

How we test barbecues

We buy grills from the shops (just like any other member of the public) and send them to our lab, where they go through a rigorous set of assessments. We read the instructions, build each grill and conduct a gas safety test on all the gas models.

Then we send each barbecue around an agility course to see how hard (or easy) it is to move, how well its wheels work and if it can be moved up and down a stair or two with ease.

We then invite our expert barbecue chef to fire up each grill. We measure the time each grill takes to get to the right cooking temperature, and we assess how easily each barbecue grills a variety of foods and how tasty the final product is.

A top-performing grill will get a Best Buy recommendation from us. These grills are easy to use, but – most importantly – are great at cooking foods to perfection. As always, our tests ignore price.

*Prices are standard and correct as of August 2018.

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