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Best coffee grinders for 2019

By Manette Kaisershot

Get the freshest-tasting coffee around with our verdict on the best coffee grinders - and the ones to avoid.

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The right coffee grinder will turn your beans into perfectly even coffee grounds, whether it be for your espresso machine or for your cafetiére. 

A precise, even grind is essential for making great coffee at home. If you're looking to make espresso, either in a traditional coffee machine or using a stove-top pot or Aeropress, you'll need fine-ground coffee. If you want to make longer black coffee in a filter machine or cafetiere, you'll need a coarser grind.

Choose a poor coffee grinder and you may end up with uneven grounds and a poorly extracted, watery brew. Read on to discover the coffee grinders we recommend for each coffee type, and the best all-rounders if you regularly make different styles of coffee at home. You can use the links below to jump to a specific section:

Need a new coffee machine? Check our coffee machine reviews to find the best models for extracting maximum flavour from your grounds.

Best and worst coffee grinders

We've tested 14 popular coffee grinders, from premium electric models with multiple grind settings to more basic manual grinders. For each we assessed how evenly and quickly they ground beans on different grind settings, and how easy they were to use.

In the table below you can see them all, rated from best to worst. Our top pick scored an impressive 83% and is a great all-rounder that grinds evenly at every level - it's not too expensive either. By contrast, our worst model is only good at producing a fine grind and requires a lot of effort to get results.

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Best coffee grinders 

Model Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   83%

 Our top pick and a great all-rounder

This affordable burr coffee grinder is the best model we've tested. It has several grind options to choose from, and grinds evenly whatever setting you use - so it's a good choice if you like making espresso or longer coffees. It's also very easy to use. The only drawback is that it takes about a minute and a half to grind, which is a little slow. 

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   74%

This burr grinder is a good option overall, with no major flaws. It will grind your coffee well and to the desired fineness, whether fine, medium or coarse, and is easy to use and clean. You can grind enough of coffee for 12, so it's handy if you like to entertain.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   71%

Best grinder for espresso fans

It's expensive, but this stylish burr grinder will get your beans perfectly ground and ready for making an espresso, and it's simple to use too. It's brilliant for espresso making, but not quite so good with coarse grinding.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   70%

Fashion forward and from a well established coffee appliance brand, this burr grinder does a good job of grinding to all levels of fineness. It is a bit pricey and a bit noisy, so it's not perfect. However, it grinds well so it's definitely worth considering. 

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   69%

Best cheap grinder for espresso fans

This stylish, compact and affordable blade grinder is even available in a fashionable copper finish. It does well at grinding coffee to a fine consistency, and you can even get a good medium grind from this simple grinder. It doesn't do as well with a coarse grind, so its better for espresso drinkers, but overall it's a pretty good all-rounder.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
  69%

This premium burr coffee grinder does a good job of producing a fine, even grind, but it doesn't do nearly as well with a coarse grind. It's slow too; for the price there are better options available.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   66%

This manual ceramic burr grinder is a favourite among coffee aficionados. No surprise that we've said it's hard to use, as you'll have to put in a bit of elbow grease to get results. It's excellent at grinding beans to a fine consistency, but isn't quite as good with coarse grinding.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   66%

This electric burr coffee grinder is good across all grind levels; fine, medium and coarse. It is also easy to use, empty and clean. Unfortunately it's also very noisy and very slow. It takes over two minutes to grind, which is long compared with other grinders.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   62%

This blade grinder is compact, inexpensive and from a trusted coffee appliance maker. However, results are very hit or miss. It does better with grinding beans to espresso fineness, but it doesn't grind to the desired level with consistency. It's also not very easy to use.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   60%

This basic blade coffee grinder has three settings, while most of this type usually have only one. However, the result isn't a better coffee grinder. It doesn't reliably grind coffee beans to a consistent powder, and it's difficult to use too.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   57%

This burr grinder looks impressive, but it's not. It basically grinds everything to a fine grind. So, while it does do a good job of preparing ground coffee for an espresso, it's not going to do a medium or coarse grind well. 

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
   56%

This inexpensive blade grinder does well at grinding beans to the desired level overall, however it doesn't excel at fine grinding, making it less than ideal if you are making espresso. In addition, it's one of the noisiest grinders we've tested.

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  Coarse grinding Fine grinding Ease of use Score
  53%

Bargain option for espresso fans willing to grind by hand

This very inexpensive manual blade grinder achieves an excellent fine grind, with a bit of elbow grease, but gets progressively worse as the grind goes from fine to coarse. You'll have to put some arm muscle into it, too. It's really cheap though, so if you love espresso and want to grind small amounts on a budget, it could be a good option.

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Table last updated August 2018

Need a coffee machine to go with your grinder? Head over to our coffee machine reviews to find the best options for your budget. 

Choosing the best coffee grinder 

Coffee grinders can be manual, where you have to turn a handle to grind the beans, or electric, where the hard work is done for you.

There are two main types: blade or burr coffee grinders. The difference is down to the method used to grind the beans. 

Burr grinders

  • Crush, rather than chop, coffee beans and they typically can produce an even and fine grind suitable for espresso makers.
  • A manual one can be picked up for as little as £20 or an automatic for as little as £25, but can cost up to £150 or more.

Blade grinders 

  • Chop your coffee beans, rather like a blender.
  • Are typically cheaper than burr grinders.
  • You can pick up a manual blade grinder for less than £10 and you can find an automatic model for about £20 or £25 pounds.

Whichever type you choose, paying more will usually get you more premium materials (eg ceramic grinding burrs and metal finishes), more grind settings to choose from and a larger grinding capacity. 

For more tips on what to look for when buying a coffee grinder, see our coffee grinder buying guide.

How we test coffee grinders 

Our independent coffee grinder tests ignore price and put all coffee grinders through the same key tests, designed to separate the best from the rest.

We assess the following:

  • How evenly and consistently each coffee grinder grinds on course, medium and fine settings
  • How long it takes to finish the job
  • If there a noticeable difference between how coarse or fine the grinds are when using the different settings
  • How easy it is to fill, use, empty and clean the grinder
  • How noisy it is

A good grinder will grind beans well on each setting; producing grinds that are consistent in texture and noticeably different from other settings. The best models will also be relatively quick, quiet and easy to use.

Poor models produce inconsistent results and are noisy or slow to do so, or a pain to use.

Coffee grinders need to score 75% or above to be named a Best Buy.

Why use a coffee grinder? 

There are many varieties of pre-ground coffee available in the supermarket so you might wonder whether a coffee grinder is really necessary?

1. Coffee is easily contaminated - ground coffee can pick up smells from exposure to other things in your kitchen. Grinding coffee on demand, rather than having a whole bag of grounds to get through, helps to prevent this from happening.

2. Not all supermarket coffee is suitable - if you're looking for espresso coffee suitable for your coffee machine, your options will be more limited at the supermarket. Ground coffee found in UK supermarkets tends to be a coarser grind for generic use - typically in cafetieres. Using a coffee grinder at home will give you greater variety as you can experiment with a wide range of beans.

3. Coffee oxidises quickly - when it hits the air it starts to lose its flavour. Freshly grinding your coffee each time you brew will help to prevent oxidation from happening.

Make sure you keep any ground coffee in an airtight container, in a cool dry place, to keep it at its best.

Ready to make your coffee? See our guide to making espresso, cappuccino and more for tips on getting the best results.

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