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Council tax bands

Check your council tax band, find out how it’s calculated and how it affects the amount of tax you'll pay.

In this article
How are council tax bands worked out? How is a new property assigned a council tax band? Can I change my council tax band? Council tax bands and banding in England
Council tax bands and banding in Scotland Council tax bands and banding in Wales Domestic rates in Northern Ireland Can I get a council tax discount?

How are council tax bands worked out?

Council tax bands are calculated based on the value of the property at a specific point in time. For instance, in England your council tax band is based on what the value of your property would have been on 1 April 1991.

Council tax bands are calculated differently in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - we explain the bands for each below.

If you don't think your property has been valued correctly you can dispute your council tax bill.

 

How is a new property assigned a council tax band?

If your property is newly built, the Valuation Office Agency for England and Wales (VOA) will automatically assess it in order to place it in a council tax band.

The assessments are based on the property’s: 

  • Size 
  • Layout
  • Character 
  • Location
  • Change in use (if applicable)
  • Value on a certain date – depending on its location (eg. 1 April 1991 in England).

If your property didn’t exist in 1991, it will be compared to the same types of properties in the area.

Can I change my council tax band?

There are instances where people feel their property has been put into the wrong council tax band.

If there have been changes to the property, such as being converted into flats, you can request a revaluation from the VOA.

Be aware that changing your home’s valuation could result in a higher council tax bill if the VOA puts you in a higher band.

If you think there was a mistake in the original valuation of your property, you can request a band review from your local valuation office.

You’ll need to explain to them why you think your banding is wrong.

You can find out more in our guide to getting a council tax discount.

Council tax bands and banding in England

Properties in England are put into one of eight bands (A-H), depending on the price they would have sold for in April 1991. 

The valuation band ranges for England are as follows:

Council tax bands in England
Council tax band Ranges of value
A Up to £40,000
B More than £40,000 and up to £52,000
C More than £52,000 and up to £68,000
D More than £68,000 and up to £88,000
E More than £88,000 and up to £120,000
F More than £120,000 and up to £160,000
G More than £160,000 and up to £320,000
H More than £320,000
 

Use our 2018 council tax calculator to see how much your local authority charges for each council tax band.

Council tax bands and banding in Scotland

Properties in Scotland are also put into one of eight bands (A-H), based on their value in April 1991. But the band ranges are different than those in England.

The valuation band ranges for Scotland are as follows:

Council tax bands in Scotland
Council tax band Ranges of value
A Up to £27,000
B More than £27,000 and up to £35,000
C More than £35,000 and up to £45,000
D More than £45,000 and up to £58,000
E More than £58,000 and up to £80,000
F More than £800,000 and up to £106,000
G More than £106,000 and up to £212,000
H More than £212,000
 

Council tax bands and banding in Wales

Properties in Wales were re-valued in 2003, meaning council tax bands are based on their market value on 1 April 2003. 

There are nine valuation bands (A-I), which are as follows:

Council tax bands in Wales
Council tax band Ranges of value
A Up to £44,000
B More than £44,000 and up to £65,000
C More than £65,000 and up to £91,000
D More than £91,000 and up to £123,000
E More than £123,000 and up to £162,000
F More than £162,000 and up to £223,000
G More than £223,000 and up to £324,000
H More than £324,000 and up to £424,000
I More than £424,000
 

Domestic rates in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland did not switch to council tax in the 1990s, but kept the old system of domestic rates, based on rental values. 

In 2007, Northern Ireland changed to a modified system of domestic rates, based on the capital value of individual properties. 

Domestic rates are worked out by multiplying the rateable capital value of your property by the domestic regional rate and domestic district rate added together. This gives the ‘domestic rate poundage’ for your council area.

The rateable capital value is specific to your home. The domestic regional rate is the amount of pence in every pound you pay to the Assembly for regional services.

The domestic district rate is the amount of pence in every pound you pay to your District council for local services.

As an example, if the capital value of your home is £80,000 and you live in the Amagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Council area, your calculation would be: £80,000 x 0.008285 = £662.80.

Here are the Northern Ireland domestic rate poundage levels for each council area in 2017/18:

Domestic rates in Northern Ireland
Council Domestic rate poundage
Antrim and Newtownabbey Council 0.007634
Ards and North Down Borough Council 0.007256
Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council 0.008285
Belfast City Council 0.007376
Causeway Coast and Glens 0.007745
Derry City and Strabane District Council 0.008724
Fermanagh and Omagh Council 0.007564
Lisburn and Castlereagh Council 0.007062
Mid and East Antrim Council 0.008269
Mid Ulster Council 0.007303
Newry, Mourne and Down Council 0.007869

Can I get a council tax discount?

There are many types of people who are eligible for a council tax discount, including full-time students and people living in a property by themselves.

Find out more: who is eligible for a council tax discount, and how to apply for one

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