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Laura Ashley heads for administration: what does it mean for customers?

What to do if you're a Laura Ashley customer with unwanted items, gift vouchers and online orders

Laura Ashley heads for administration: what does it mean for customers?

Fashion and furniture chain, Laura Ashley, has filed for administration after talks to save the company were halted by the coronavirus pandemic.

The company said the virus had ‘an immediate and significant impact on trading and ongoing developments indicate that this will be a sustained national situation’.

PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers) has been appointed as administrator.

If you’re a Laura Ashley customer, here’s what you need to know.

Returns and gift vouchers

Laura Ashley is no longer accepting returns, exchanges or gift cards.

Online orders

Laura Ashley’s online store is still up and running, and the company has said it’s working hard to fulfill all orders.

This situation might change in the next few days or weeks, so it’s worth keeping an eye on your delivery status if you’re awaiting an order.

If you want to return an online purchase, make sure to do so swiftly to ensure you get your money back quickly.

If you’re planning buying something worth more than £100, use your credit card. You’re protected by Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, and can contact your credit provider for a refund if Laura Ashley closes down and there’s a problem with what you’ve bought.

We’ll update this page as we hear more.

What are my rights when a company goes bust?

We could see more retailers collapse over the next few weeks as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

If you’re left with a faulty or unwanted item that you can no longer return, there are a few other ways you can try to get your money back:

Find out more about your rights when a retailer goes bust

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