We use cookies to allow us and selected partners to improve your experience and our advertising. By continuing to browse you consent to our use of cookies. You can understand more and change your cookies preferences here.

Technology.

When you click on a retailer link on our site, we may earn affiliate commission to help fund our not-for-profit mission.Find out more.

Best PS5 and gaming headsets

We've tested PS5 headsets and gaming headsets that work with PS4, Xbox, PC and Nintendo Switch
Joel Bates
PS5 console and PS5 gaming headset

The best gaming headsets can really be game-changers, helping to immerse you in stunning virtual worlds and giving you the advantage in competitive multiplayer matches where heightened awareness and quick reflexes are key.

In March 2022, we tested 10 of the UK's bestselling gaming headsets on the PS5, including major brands such as Turtle Beach, Razer, Steelseries, Astro and more, to find out which ones you should buy.

Our tests uncovered several fantastic Best Buys – two of them costing less than £100.

Most of the headsets we tested also work on other games consoles as well as PC and Mac, so if you play on your computer, Xbox Series X or Nintendo Switch, we've still got excellent gaming headsets to recommend.

Read on to find out which gaming headsets we like best for PS5, as well as important things to look for when shopping around for the best gaming headsets. Plus we demystify some jargon – useful if you're new to gaming headsets or buying one for someone else and want to get your head around the terminology.

Prices and availability last checked: 1 August 2022.

Tech tips you can trustget our free Tech newsletter for advice, news, deals and stuff the manuals don’t tell you

The best PS5 headsets

Only logged-in members can view the gaming headset test results below.

If you're not yet a member, you'll see an alphabetically ordered list of the gaming headsets we tested. Join Which? now to get instant access to our test results and Best Buy recommendations below.

Astro A20 Gen 2

Cheapest price: £79.99 available at Smyths Toys, also available at Amazon, Argos, Astro

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz, 15m range)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac

Approx. battery life: 15 hours

Latency: 190ms

Other key features: EQ presets (Astro, Studio, Pro), chat/game audio mixer, volume control, mute, 316g

If an Astro gaming headset is on your shopping list you'll have seen many cost much more than £100, so if the cheaper Astro A20 has well-balanced sound and the comfortable fit you need for lengthy gaming sessions, it could be a steal.

We tested the Astro A20 alongside more expensive headsets to see how it stands up to pricier competition.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Astro A40 TR

Cheapest price: £149.99 available at Amazon, Astro, Robert Dyas, Very.

Type: Wired

Connects via: 3.5mm headphone cable

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Cable length: 2m (mute cable), 1.5m (PC splitter)

Latency: 180ms (with MixAmp Pro)

Other key features: 7.1 surround sound, Dolby Atmos (Xbox Series X/S and PC only), volume control, chat/game audio mixer (MixAmp Pro required for all features), open-back design, 369g

The Astro A40 is the second of two Astro gaming headsets we tested and the only one in our line-up with an open-back design. This means it spills sound out of the headset on purpose to help make the audio sound more 3D. It also means if you share the room with someone else they might be able to hear you playing. 

We considered this, along with everything else that makes the best gaming headsets, when deciding whether to recommend you buy it.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Gioteck TX70

Cheapest price: £34.99 available at Game, also available at Amazon, Argos, Gioteck.

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz, 10m range)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Approx. battery life: 15 hours

Latency: 160ms

Other key features: 3.5mm headphone cable included, bass boost button, volume control, mute, 320g

Wireless gaming headsets are usually more expensive to buy than wired ones, but the wireless Gioteck TX70 costs just as little as the cheapest wired gaming headsets we tested.

Our tests investigated if it's as much of a bargain as it appears.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Kingston HyperX Cloud II Wired

Cheapest price: £73.99 available at Amazon, also available at Currys, Game

Type: Wired

Connects via: 3.5mm headphone cable, USB cable

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Cable length: 1m (3.5mm headphone cable), 2m (USB cable)

Latency: n/a

Other key features: 7.1 surround sound (USB only), sidetone control (USB only), volume control (USB only), mute (USB only), detachable microphone, carry bag and alternative earcups included, 320g

The HyperX Cloud II has optional 7.1 surround sound, which helps you to pinpoint precisely where sounds are coming from and could make all the difference when playing competitive online games.

We tested it out during online matches of Call of Duty: Warzone to see if the surround sound gave us an extra edge during play.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Razer Kaira for PlayStation

Cheapest price: £78.96 available at Amazon, also available at Argos, Currys, Razer, Very.

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz/Bluetooth, 10m range)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, PC, Bluetooth-enabled smartphones (calls only)

Approx. battery life: 30 hours

Latency: 150ms

Other key features: EQ customisable via Razer Audio app, chat/game audio mixer, sidetone control, volume control, mute, Bluetooth connection to mobile phone possible for taking phone calls only (no music), 2x cable tidies, cable covers and Razer stickers included, 332g

Although the Razer Kaira we tested is designed for use with PS5, it can be used on PS4 and PC. There's an alternative version available that's specifically designed for the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S.

Could this headset be good enough that you'll want to use it wherever you play your games?

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Sony Pulse 3D Wireless Headset

Cheapest price: £79.95 available at Amazon, also available at Argos, Currys, Game, John Lewis, PlayStation Store.

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz, 10m range)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Approx. battery life: 12 hours

Latency: 190ms

Other key features: 3.5mm headphone cable included, EQ presets (Standard, Bass Boost, Shooter, Custom), chat/game audio mixer, sidetone control, volume control, mute, 3D audio-enabled, 292g

Sony's flagship gaming headset is specially designed to work with the PS5's Tempest 3D Audio feature, so we were curious to see just how immersed we could be in games that are designed to make use of it.

We tested out the Sony Pulse 3D Wireless Headset while playing Horizon: Forbidden West on the PS5 to find out.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

SteelSeries Arctis 1

Cheapest price: £39.99 available at Currys (out of stock), also available at Amazon, Argos  Game, SteelSeries.

Type: Wired

Connects via: 3.5mm headphone cable

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Cable length: 1.3m

Latency: n/a

Other key features: Volume control, mute, detachable microphone, 272g

As well as being one of the cheapest gaming headsets we tested, the SteelSeries Arctis 1 is also one of the most straightforward to set up. All you need to do is plug the cable into the headphone port of your controller.

But we did find it lacking in some things. Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results and find out what they were. 

SteelSeries Arctis 7P+ Wireless

Cheapest price: £174.99 available at Amazon, Argos, Steelseries, also available at Currys.

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz, 12m range)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Approx. battery life: 30 hours

Latency: 120ms

Other key features: 3.5mm headphone cable included, EQ customisable via SteelSeries Engine software, sidetone control, volume control, mute, answer calls, play/pause and skip music controls, retractable microphone, 3D audio-enabled, 358g

At the other end of the pricing scale from the Steelseries Arctis 1, the Arctis 7P+ Wireless is one of the most expensive headsets available from this popular brand.

If SteelSeries has taken your fancy, our tests reveal whether it's worth spending more.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Turtle Beach Recon 200

Cheapest price: £34.99 available at Currys, also available at Amazon, Argos, Game, Smyths Toys, Turtle Beach (out of stock).

Type: Wired

Connects via: 3.5mm headphone cable

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox Series X/S/One, PC, Mac, any device compatible with a 3.5mm headphone cable

Cable length: 1.27m

Latency: n/a

Other key features: Amplified audio EQ preset (charging required, 12 hours battery life), sidetone control, volume control, mute, Turtle Beach sticker included, 274g

Turtle Beach is one of the most sought-after gaming headset brands, and the Recon 200 is the cheapest gaming headset we bought for our tests. If it's one of the best, it could prove to be fantastic value for money.

We found lots to impress us for the price, but our tests did reveal better.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock all our test results.

Turtle Beach Stealth 600 Gen 2

Cheapest price: £89.99 available at Argos, Currys, Game  Smyths Toys, Turtle Beach.

Type: Wireless

Connects via: Wireless USB dongle (2.4GHz, range not stated)

Compatible with: PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch (docked mode only)

Approx. battery life: 15 hours

Latency: 160ms

Other key features: EQ presets (Signature Sound, Bass Boost, Bass + Treble Boost, Vocal Boost), EQ customisable via Turtle Beach Audio Hub software, sidetone control, volume control, mute, 3D audio-enabled, Turtle Beach sticker included, 285g

The Turtle Beach Stealth 600 is more expensive that its Recon 200 stablemate, but it comes with plenty of extra customisation options for the price so you can fine-tune the sound to the way you like it.

We put its capabilities to the test by playing competitive shooters and immersive single-player games to see if the Stealth 600 will meet all your gaming needs.

Log in now or join Which? to unlock our test results.

Man playing video games

How much do I need to spend to get the best gaming headset?

Of the 10 bestselling headsets we tested, eight cost less than £100, and two of those impressed us enough to be named among our Which? Best Buy gaming headsets.

However, when you get into the super-cheap territory, you're unlikely to get a headset that'll really blow you away with how it sounds.

Based on our test results, we'd recommend spending at least £50-£70 to get yourself a gaming headset worth shouting about.

Treat your ears to the richest sounds all round: Best headphones for 2022 and buying guide.

Gaming headsets jargon to know before you buy

  • Sidetone When you speak into your microphone, you can usually hear yourself talking through your own headset in real-time. This is sidetone. Some headsets have a control that lets you adjust how loudly your voice comes through. Some gamers prefer to hear themselves, and others don't want to hear themselves at all.
  • Spatial audio, 3D audio and surround sound There are slight technical differences between these, but they all essentially deal with helping you know what direction sound effects are coming from. When playing competitive multiplayer games, it can give you an edge to be able to tell where your opponents are based on sound.
  • Latency The delay between action happening on-screen and the sound of it playing through your headset. Bluetooth connections can suffer from poor latency, but most wireless headsets use USB dongles which have such good latency that the delay is pretty much unnoticeable.
  • EQ presets Customised sound settings for your headset. Common presets include bass boost, which heightens the deeper sounds, treble boost, which heightens higher sounds, and vocal boost, which makes spoken word louder. Some headsets have accompanying software that let you create your own EQ presets.
  • Open-back design Headsets or headphones with an open-back design allow more airflow into the earcups, which allows audio to spill and makes it sound as though it's happening in a wider space. This can help game audio sound more realistic and 3D, but also prevents background noise from being blocked out, and the sound spilling from the headphones can be annoying for people you share the room with.
  • Boom microphone The long, protruding microphone that sits in front of your mouth and that you speak directly into. Boom microphones are usually the highest quality, but not all of them are. Headsets without boom microphones rely on a smaller, built-in microphone inside the ear cups. They can suffice, but rarely provide the crisp quality that the best boom microphones do.

Should I buy a wireless gaming headset or a wired gaming headset?

Wireless gaming headsets are more popular than wired ones. 

You might find the cables on wired gaming headsets obstructive, but some competitive gamers still prefer to opt for a wired connection as there's usually less risk of latency issues creeping in.

Latency is the delay between something happening in your game and the sound of it playing through your headset. A higher latency means a bigger delay, so there might be a lag between a character speaking in a game and you hearing their voice.

However, unlike older wireless headsets, which usually used Bluetooth connections that are more prone to poor latency, most now use USB dongles, which reduce that delay to the tiniest fractions of a second.

The worst latency of the wireless gaming headsets we tested was 190ms, or 0.19 seconds. We didn't find this noticeable during play, so we wouldn't let this put you off buying a wireless headset.

In terms of sound quality, there isn't much to split the two types, either. In our tests we found both wired and wireless headsets that we loved.

The main notable difference is price. The same headsets can come in wired and wireless versions, and the wireless version is usually around £50 more expensive.

Having the same conundrum with your headphones? Read our guide on Wired vs wireless headphones.

5 things to look for when looking to buy the best gaming headset

  1. Detachable or retractable microphone You can save a lot of money if you buy a headset that can double up as a pair of headphones, but it could look a little odd to go out and about with a microphone in front of your face. Some gaming headsets have detachable or retractable microphones as a solution to this, so look out for this feature if you're keen on using your headset for listening to music.
  2. Sturdy build quality Some of the headsets we tested seemed flimsy and had noticeable weak spots, especially around the earcups. If you want your headset to last, look for a robust build that seems like it will stand up to a bit of punishment. Metal headbands or earcup adjusters are usually a good sign.
  3. Earcup padding All gaming headsets come with some squishy padding around the ear cups to help keep them comfortable over long periods of use. Consider what material they're made of when choosing, though. Some are made of foam or fabric, which are better for air flow, while others are made of faux leather, which is better for isolating background noise and slowing wear and tear.
  4. Voice/game volume controls and sidetone If you're struggling to hear your teammates over the game audio, or conversely if your friends' voices are making it difficult to hear the game, it's a major issue if you can't fix it. Most gaming headsets come with controls so you can adjust the volume of the game and voice chat to your liking, but not all of them do. Keep an eye out for this essential feature when buying.
  5. Replacement parts After many lengthy gaming sessions, even the toughest headsets won't last forever. Check how long your guarantee is and what's covered by it, but also whether the manufacturer sell replacement parts to help extend the life of your headset.

How we tested gaming headsets

We bought 10 of the most popular gaming headsets from major UK retailers and put each through several gaming sessions on the PlayStation 5.

Every gaming headset we tested was purchased anonymously and we don't take freebies, so you can be sure our reviews are neutral and independent.

Ease of use and setup

Gaming headsets should be straightforward to set up and easy to control without too much need to take the headset off to look at the buttons or reach for the instruction booklet.

We rated each headset we tested for how easy it was to set up and use, as well as how easily we were able to navigate the controls and settings.

Comfort and durability

A comfortable headset is essential if you plan on playing for several hours at a time. To judge each headset we tested for comfort, we wore each one for a minimum of two hours so that we could find out not only how comfortable they are when you first put them on, but if they become less comfortable over time.

We also noted the materials that each headset was made from, looked for any obvious weak spots in the design and stress-tested any cables to see how durable they are.

Sound quality

Nothing is more important than sound quality when finding the best gaming headsets. For some gamers, richly detailed sound that immerses you in the world of the game is most important, and for others the ability to pinpoint exactly where sounds are coming from to get a competitive edge on their opponents is their priority.

To judge each headset on its suitability for each playstyle, we used each headset to play Horizon: Forbidden West, an immersive single-player adventure with detailed environments and vibrant sound effects, and Call of Duty: Warzone, an intense and competitive multiplayer shooter where knowing where your enemies are is one of the most important aspects of the game.

The headsets we rated best were those that catered well to both playstyles and that had rich and evenly balanced sound levels. We also took note of which headsets distracted with background noise, and which ones spilled the game audio too much so they might annoy someone else in the room.

To see how well they work as a pair of over-ear headphones we also listened to music with each headset and brought them into our test labs, where we had their latency tested and recorded.

Microphone quality

For gamers who like to play online or with their friends, a high-quality microphone that lets you communicate with clarity and ease is essential.

To test the microphone of each headset we used each one to record ourselves saying a tongue twister, and then listened back to it using a pair of Best Buy headphones to judge how crisply and cleanly the speech came through.

Recordings that skipped, sounded muffled or that suffered from interference were penalised.

If you'd rather fill your living room with game sounds instead of your ears, compare our sound bar reviews.