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Technology.

Updated: 5 May 2022

Best TVs for sound

From screechy soundtracks to muffled dialogue, we’ve heard it all. If you want a great TV experience without needing a sound bar, check out this round-up of the best sounding sets.
Martin Pratt
Watching-TV-LCD LED advice

There’s more to a TV than picture quality. And we believe you shouldn’t need to buy a sound bar or surround sound system to get a great experience from your brand new TV.

Perhaps you don’t have room for a sound bar or simply don’t want to spend yet more money after buying a new TV. Here, we round up the TVs that not only have the best sound quality, but also still deliver the same great picture and easy-to-use smart-TV platform as all of our Best Buy sets.

There are also settings you can tweak and devices you can buy for your current TV if the sound is poor. Head to our guide on how to hear your TV better for help on this.

Only logged-in Which? members can view our recommendations in the table. If you’re not yet a member, try Which? to get instant access.

The best sounding TVs

  • 78%
    • best buy
    £1099.00

    This excellent TV creates room filling sound that's perfectly balanced so whatever you like to watch you can be sure it will sound superb.

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  • 76%
    • best buy
    £1299.00

    The special sound processing tech on this TV means it really feels like it's coming from specific parts of the screen. It's impressive and rich.

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  • 72%
    • best buy
    £1999.00

    Comfortably one of the best sounding TVs around. It does an excellent job with stereo separation and it feels expansive. Its HDR use is exemplary, too.

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Not found the set for you? Browse all of our TV reviews

And here's one to avoid

TV sound quality varies wildly, and modern flatscreen TVs have a poor reputation when judged against their boxy CRT predecessors. But recent years have seen some TVs deliver quality sound despite their ultra-thin profile. That said, poor-sounding TVs are still easy to find – here are some of the worst we’ve seen in the Which? test lab.

  • As long as people still want a TV for their kitchen or bedroom there will always be a demand for 24-inch TVs, but a small screen doesn't excuse low quality. The sound is horrendous and in motion, the picture is a blurry mess.

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Should I buy a sound bar or surround sound system?

If your TV sounds great on its own, is there really any point splashing out on a surround sound system, too? A sound bar – something specifically designed for the best audio– should sound better than a TV, which has many other functions.

  • Sound bars - these are generally the simplest way of improving your TV sound. You only need one HDMI cable to connect to the TV and many have a separate subwoofer to help with bass. You can pay more than the cost of a TV for one, but you Best Buys are available for around the £300 mark. Our panel often find cheaper models that have crisp, clear vocals and great width to really fill the room with sound. Although many sound bars promise a surround sound effect (as do many TVs) none of them manage it unless they have separate speakers that sit behind you.
  • Home cinema systems - for that cinematic 360 degree audio you need a home cinema system because you'll have speakers behind you. These are more of a faff to set up due to the long wires required to reach the rear speakers, but some can be connected wirelessly.
  • Connecting speakers you already have - if you have hi-fi or wireless speakers you may be able to connect them to your TV. You may find that newer TVs lack RCA inputs (the red and white speaker wires) but most have a 3.5mm connection. Connecting a pair of hi-fi speakers is likely to be your best option since you can position them more freely. It's especially useful for creating better stereo separation, so sound is more clearly coming from the left and right of the TV.

Head to our buying guide for the best sound bars to see which do a top job of upgrading your TV audio.