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1 October 2020

Nutribullet vs Nutri Ninja

We've put blenders from big blending rivals Nutribullet and Nutri Ninja to the test. Find out how they compare below.
Nutribullet vs Nutri Ninja
AW
Aaron West

Nutribullet has blitzed its way to the top of the smoothie lover's wish list in the past couple of years, but rival brand Nutri Ninja is hot on its heels in the popularity stakes.

Both blender brands have several options available, from an entry-level model for around £70 up to an all-singing all-dancing version costing over £100. But do you need to buy a pricey premium model, or is the original version the best? And which brand makes the best blender? 

We've lined up the key models from each brand in the tables below so you can see what you get if you pay more, and decide which blender is right for you.

Which? members can log in to find out whether a Nutribullet or Nutri Ninja should be the blender of their choice. If you're not yet a member, join Which? to get instant access to all our reviews.

Nutribullet 600 vs Nutri NinjaBL580UKV

Nutribullet 600

Nutribullet 600

£51.00
Reviewed

The original little blender with the huge claims - it 'literally pulverises everything' according to the makers. It's a great size if you're making a smoothie for one or two, but how smooth are they really?

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Nutri Ninja FreshVac Personal Blender BL580UKV

Nutri Ninja FreshVac Personal Blender BL580UKV

£95.00
Reviewed

An innovative vacuum blender from big-name manufacturer Nutri Ninja. It has a regular personal cup blender design, but comes with a unique additional FreshVac pump that takes six AA batteries, which are included in the box.

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Nutribullet Pro 900 vs Nutri Ninja Auto IQ BL480UK

Nutribullet Pro 900

Nutribullet Pro 900

£79.99
Reviewed

This is the bigger 'Pro' version of the original Nutribullet 600 - boasting a more powerful motor and larger cup sizes - but is bigger actually better in the world of mini-blending?

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Nutri Ninja Auto IQ BL480UK

Nutri Ninja Auto IQ BL480UK

£109.99
Reviewed

The Nutri Ninja Auto IQ BL480UK claims to extract hidden nutrition from whole fruit and vegetables and to take the guesswork out of blending. Find out how well it does in our tests and if it takes top spot in the Nutri Ninja family or beats the Nutribullet clan.

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Nutribullet vs Nutri Ninja - what's the difference?

The mighty Nutribullet Rx packs the most power of these six blenders - at 1700W. And once it's blended your soup, it can heat it up. However it weighs in at close to 4kg, so isn't exactly a handy little personal blender, and you'll have to part with around £128 to get one. 

The largest of the Nutri Ninja family - the Pro Complete - has an 1100W motor and is substantially lighter (2.9kg) and cheaper than the Nutribullet Rx - around £90.

The Nutribullet Pro 900 and Nutri Ninja Auto IQ are similar in terms of power, weight and jug capacity, though you have a choice of three speed settings with the Ninja. Having more than one speed can increase the versatility of your blender, as you have more control for making things like mayonnaise.

The smallest of the Nutribullets, the 600, comes with two handy 300ml containers - great for smoothies for one, while the Nutri Ninja BL450UK's smallest cup is at bulkier 500ml.

If space is a priority, it's worth knowing that the Nutribullet blenders are slightly more compact than the Nutri Ninja versions, so will take up less space in your kitchen.

We tested all six blenders on popular fruit smoothie recipes and with tougher ingredients such as ginger, ice, nuts and leafy greens.  To find out more about the rigours we put all our tested blenders through, go to how we test blenders.

If the idea of tracking the nutritional information of your smoothies - including all the protein, fats, sugar, vitamins and minerals -  appeals to you, the Nutribullet Balance could take the cake. It uses a built-in weighing scale and Bluetooth connectivity to allow you to access and track the nutritional make-up of your smoothies directly via the Nutribullet app. But this comes at a premium; the Balance is currently priciest member of the Nutribullet family, at £150.

If you frequently use your Nutribullet, the manufacturer recommends that you replace the blade unit every six months to maintain ‘optimal performance’. Not replacing it can cause leaks as the rubber seal in the blade unit becomes less effective over time. The cost of a replacement blade unit is around £10-£15 depending on the model. For more information, head to our Nutribullet buying guide.

Are cheaper blenders worth considering?

The Nutribullet and Nutri Ninja blenders are undeniably popular, but if you don't want the price tag that comes with them, there are plenty of alternative models to consider.

Our tests have uncovered some brilliant cheaper personal or mini blenders - we've even found some decent models for less than £20. To find the best blender for your needs and your budget check out our blender reviews.

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