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Home & garden.

6 September 2021

Best food processors and mini choppers

Whether you're looking for the best premium food processor or a cheaper mini chopper, we recommend the top models to buy in 2021
JP
Joseph Perry
Food processor hummus

The best food processors and mini choppers take the hassle out of food prep. But not all models are fit for purpose – we've found some that struggle with the most basic tasks, such as grating cheese and dicing an onion.

To help you avoid a dud, we've handpicked our favourites from our full list of the best food processors. Each has gone through our rigorous lab tests, so you can be sure it's up to scratch.

We've also found three models that are so substandard, we think you should avoid them no matter how attractive their prices might seem.

Only logged-in Which? members can view our recommendations in the table below. If you're not yet a member, join Which? to get instant access.

Best food processors

  • 80%
    £350.00

    This food processor chops and grates well, but really comes into its own when slicing, mixing and kneading. And it's not just your stand mixer that you can do away with if you buy this model; it's also brilliant at blending soup and making smoothies – if you're looking for a single appliance that does it all, look no further.

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  • 76%
    £99.00

    This food processor is another excellent all-rounder – in fact, its ratings never dropped below four stars in our tests. It comes with a reversible grating disk for fine and coarse grating, and you have a choice of two speed options per power setting (giving you a total of six settings to choose from). It's also as quiet as we've come across, so you won't disturb anyone in bed or working from home.

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  • 75%
    £79.00

    This processor comes with ingenious programs that automatically detect the best speed and pulse ratio for your food, so you can put your feet up while the machine does the work and thinking for you. Just don't expect the results to be flawless: the automatic chopping was rather haphazard.

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Best mini choppers

  • 77%
    £50.00

    There aren't many mini choppers better at chopping and puréeing than this. It's small and lightweight – at 24cm tall with a 0.9-litre bowl capacity – which makes it well suited to a crowded kitchen. It also has a whipping function, but we wouldn't recommend buying this model for this feature; the cream we whipped came out much stodgier than we'd have liked.

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  • 75%
    £17.49

    This model makes light work of small chopping tasks. It ground down a handful of herbs in less than 30 seconds, with no rogue pieces stuck to the sides of the bowl – and because you can pop it in the dishwasher, it wouldn't be a disaster if there were. However, you can only use it in 60-second bursts before it has to cool down for another minute, so it's not the best option if you have a large family or you're catering for a crowd.

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Table last updated: September 2021.

Not found the right food processor for you? See all of our food processor reviews.

Three food processors to avoid

There's a lot to like about food processors, but it doesn't include this trio of lacklustre models. All three fail to achieve the standards you'd expect from a top food processor – we think you should avoid them.

Only logged-in Which? members can view the models to avoid in the table below. If you're not yet a member, join Which? to get instant access.

  • 49%
    £161.22

    This food processor comes in several attractive colours, but each is just as bad as the next. Although it's decent at some baking tasks, it's simply not good enough at chopping, grating or slicing to warrant buying.

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  • 52%
    £60.00

    This food processor is a jack of all trades and master of one: kneading. But with the best models capable of five-star chopping, grating, slicing and more, it falls a long way short of Best Buy standards.

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  • 54%
    £159.00

    This food processor really struggled to keep pace with the best models in our tests. It's particularly bad at blending soup, making smoothies and puréeing – and so loud that even a quick whizz could give you a headache.

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Table last updated: September 2021.

Buying a food processor: what to consider

We've tested models ranging from £15 to a few hundred pounds, but you don't need to spend that much for a great food processor – we've found some budget models that work as well, if not better, than much more expensive options.

Whatever you're willing to spend on a food processor, here are three things to consider before buying:

1. Food processor or mini chopper

Broadly speaking, there are two types of food processor: standard food processors and mini choppers:

  • Food processors are bigger and tend to come with a wide range of attachments – as well as chopping and slicing, most can whip, whisk, mix and knead too. This makes them a good choice if you don't have the budget or countertop space for a separate stand mixer.
  • Mini choppers are smaller and less versatile (they're usually limited to chopping and puréeing) but tend to be more affordable than standard food processors.

2. Size and weight

If you opt for a food processor, you'll have to work out how much capacity you need – it's best to avoid paying over the odds for a large processor, which will also be heavier and harder to store, if a smaller model will do.

How much capacity you need depends on what you plan to make (and how hungry your are) but as a rough guide:

  • 2.6 litres is enough for three portions.
  • 3 litres is enough for four portions.
  • 3.6 litres is enough for five portions.

3. Accessories

All food processors come with a knife blade for basic tasks, but some models come with plenty more attachments. We've seen:

  • blenders
  • citrus juicers
  • dough hooks
  • grating blades
  • mills
  • mini bowls
  • shredding blades
  • slicing blades
  • spatulas

To find out what they do and whether you need them, check out our guide to food processor attachments

And for more buying advice, see our guide on how to buy the best food processor.