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Which was the cheapest supermarket in November 2019?

Waitrose was the most expensive supermarket last month – but which was the cheapest?

Which was the cheapest supermarket in November 2019?

Sainsbury’s was the cheapest supermarket in November 2019, according to Which? research.

In our monthly supermarket costs comparison, we found that Sainsbury’s shoppers would have paid £122.43 for a trolley of 63 branded grocery and toiletry items.

People shopping at November’s most expensive supermarket, Waitrose, would have paid £135.63 – that’s £13.20 more – for exactly the same items.

Supermarket Cost of sample basket

£122.43

£124.25

£125.03

£129.64

£132.68

£135.63

Asda was the second-cheapest supermarket at £124.25, while Ocado was the second-most expensive at £132.68. Morrisons and Tesco were in the middle.

This is the fifth month this year that Sainsbury’s has come out cheapest in our independent investigation.

Asda has been cheapest four months this year so far, meaning that in January 2020 – when we announce the cheapest supermarket of 2019 – it could well be neck and neck with Sainsbury’s.

How we compare supermarket prices

Using data from independent price comparison site MySupermarket.co.uk, we calculate the average price (including special offers but not multibuys) for a trolley of popular branded items.

In November, the trolley contained 63 products, including Alpen muesli, Cathedral City cheddar cheese, Hellmann’s mayonnaise, Mr Kipling Cherry Bakewells and Weetabix. It also included everyday essentials like deodorant and shaving foam.

We tracked the price of each item throughout the month at six supermarkets to calculate an average and reveal the cheapest and most expensive places to shop.

The links below take you to our reviews of each supermarket.

We compared prices at:

We’re unable to include Aldi or Lidl because our price comparison is based on data from supermarkets’ websites, and these shops don’t sell branded groceries online.

How did the supermarkets do in our Christmas taste tests?

Our lucky food experts have had a busy month taste-testing Christmas puddings, mince pies and champagne in order to unearth the very best Christmas foods that money can buy.

The best Christmas puddings

Aldi topped our taste test to gain the best premium Christmas pudding crown for 2019, beating Fortnum & Mason, Harrods and Selfridges.

Our panel of experts blind-tasted 13 premium Christmas puddings, all of which were judged on taste, texture, aroma and appearance. We also tasted puddings from Asda, Lidl, M&S, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Waitrose & Partners.

You can find out how your favourite store ranked by checking our chart of the best Christmas puddings.

The best mince pies

Meanwhile M&S came out top for mince pies. M&S Collection Mince Pies (£2.50, or 42p a pie) scored 87% in our blind taste test of 11 supermarket mince pies.

See our round-up of the best mince pies for 2019 to find out whether luxury pies are worth splashing out on.

The best champagne

A £20, Waitrose champagne beat other supermarket fizz to be named a Which? Best Buy for Christmas 2019.

See how others scored in our round-up of the best champagnes of 2019 and find out the three supermarket best red wines of 2019.

The best turkeys (and trimmings)

We asked 4,226 Which? members about their turkey centrepiece (and all the trimmings too), based on the quality of the food, how nice it tasted and how much it delivered for the price they paid. Our members who chose specialist suppliers, butchers and farm shops were the most likely to rate the taste and quality of their meat.

The supermarkets weren’t far behind, though. One in particular wowed our members with how much they got for their money.

Find out where it was in our guide to the best place to buy your turkey and trimmings.

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