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Five cheap pushchairs we’ve tested this spring

Britax, Silver Cross and Cosatto models are just some of bargain strollers we’ve tested recently

Five cheap pushchairs we’ve tested this spring

Is it possible to get a great pushchair or stroller for less than £200?

We’ve tested an enormous range of pushchairs, and some of them could be a good option if you’re on a budget.

Below are the pros and cons of just some of the strollers we’ve put through our tough pushchair tests. They’re listed from cheapest to most expensive, but all cost less than £200.

Compare all our stroller and pushchair reviews .

Red Kite Push Me Kwik, £85

The super-lightweight Push Me Kwik from Red Kite has a nearly flat seat unit, so it’s suitable from birth, and should last until your child weighs 15kg, which is around three years old.

It claims to have a one-handed fold and, at just 6kg, it should be easy to move around when folded or if you’re lifting it up stairs. But lightweight pushchairs such as this often have small wheels that can affect the ride quality.

Read the full review of the Red Kite Push Me Kwik to find out what our panel of parents and experts thought when pushing it over a range of surfaces.

Silver Cross Sprite, £140

The Silver Cross Sprite is another ultra-light stroller that you can use from birth until your little one weighs a massive 25kg – that’s around age five – so you’re unlikely to need it then unless your child has mobility issues.

It has a seat that’s forward-facing only and two brake pedals – one for the each of the back wheels. Its umbrella-fold mechanism means that it collapses down to a long, thin shape, and at only 6.5kg it should be easy to lift and carry.

During our structural testing, we set up all pushchairs to be pushed over a bumpy ‘rolling road’ for the equivalent of 200km, to see how each one copes. Find out what happened to this pushchair by reading the full review of the Silver Cross Sprite.

Cosatto Woosh 2, £170

The eye-catching designs of Cosatto pushchairs mean that the Cosatto Woosh 2 can be spotted a mile off. And if you don’t see it,  might hear it, as the pushchair comes with its own bicycle-type bell.

Cosatto claims it’s a ‘perfectly portable pushchair’, which is a fair call given it weighs a very reasonable 7.5kg. And while it’s not travel-system compatible, it is suitable from birth as the seat reclines to a nearly flat position.

Find out whether the fold can be managed one-handed (as the manufacturer claims) and if it’s comfortable for your baby, by reading our full review of the Cosatto Woosh 2.

Tutti Bambini Momi, £159

The Tutti Bambini Momi is light to lift and pretty compact, fitting into a handy travel bag that keeps it neatly together and protected when not in use.

The box and instructions state that the maximum weight of your child for this pushchair is 15kg, but on the manufacturer’s website and on the seat of the stroller it says the weight limit is 22kg, which is about five years old. We tested this pushchair at the higher weight.

Find out whether the Tutti Bambini Momi could survive our tough structural tests with 22kg in the seat by reading the full review.

Britax B-Agile M, £180

The B-Agile M is a travel-system pushchair that’s suitable from birth, thanks to a pushchair seat that’s nearly flat. You can attach a Britax Romer infant carrier or a Britax carrycot, but the price above is just for the pushchair.

The handlebars aren’t adjustable, which may affect comfort when pushing, depending on how tall you are. But the shopping basket, despite looking on the small side, can take 4kg, which is above average for a stroller.

To find out whether it can also provide a comfortable ride for your baby, both on- and off-road, read the full Britax B-Agile M pushchair review.

What do Which? pushchair tests uncover?

We combine lab-based strength, safety and durability tests with assessments by parents and experts on real-life usage and these help us to answer the following questions:

  • Is the pushchair safe and durable?
  • Is the seat comfortable for your baby?
  • What’s the pushchair like to push?
  • Is it easy to fold and store the pushchair?
  • Is there anything I should watch out for?

Our testing uncovers an enormous range of safety and ease-of-use issues, including finger entrapments, broken pushchair chassis, jerky hood canopies, tricky or bulky folds and potential choking hazards.

But we also discover some really fantastic pushchairs that are safe, strong and provide a smooth and comfortable ride. Find out which models these are by visiting our round-up of the best pushchairs.

To find out more about our testing, read how we test pushchairs.

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