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Lidl has cheap leaf blowers on sale, but are they worth buying?

We tried out Lidl’s newest leaf blowers to see how well they perform for the price

Lidl has cheap leaf blowers on sale, but are they worth buying?

The Parkside Electric Leaf Blower & Vacuum and Parkside Petrol Leaf Blower will be available in the Middle of Lidl from 17 October 2021.

Autumn leaves are starting to fall and make paths and paving slippery. It’s also a good idea to take them off the lawn to stop them from killing your grass. A broom or rake can do the job, but a leaf blower promises to make it easier.

Lidl has an electric leaf blower for only £29.99 and a petrol model for £89.99, both of which go on sale on the 17 October. We tried them out to find out if they actually do a good job of blowing and collecting leaves without being so noisy that it drives your neighbours mad.

Go straight to the top performers: the best leaf blowers we’ve tested.


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Are they a good deal?

Parkside Electric leaf blower, £29.99

Image of Parkside Electric Leaf Blower Vacuum

Even a lower-range corded leaf blower often sets you back around £50, so at first glance £29.99 seems like a steal. 

This model manages to pack in a blower, vacuum and an in built shredder for the price.

Vacuums at this level often struggle to gather up leaves effectively, frequently becoming blocked up and needing to be cleared out. They do work well at blowing leaves into piles though.

So what are the specs?

  • A 34-litre collection bag for the vacuum
  • A single lever to switch easily between blowing to suction
  • An adjustable shoulder strap
  • 10-metre cord

These stats compare well with other leaf blowers, especially ones at a similar price point. 

Given that it is corded, buying and replacing batteries isn’t something you need to worry about. The shredder promises to break down leaves as they are vacuumed up, reducing their volume and speeding up how quickly they can be composted. 

Read our first look review of the Lidl Parkside Electric Leaf Blower & Vacuum to find out what our gardening experts thought of it.

Parkside Petrol leaf blower, £89.99

Image of Parkside Petrol Leaf Blower

Petrol leaf blowers often cost between £100-£500, so at £89.99 the Parkside Petrol Leaf Blower is an inexpensive option. 

It weighs 9kg and carries more than a litre of fuel. It doesn’t have any vacuum functionality, so it’s probably best suited for a large garden where you want to blow leaves into piles to collect afterwards by hand. Keep in mind fuel costs when you consider this as well.

Here are the specs:

  • A 1;300ml fuel tank
  • Backpack unit
  • 750m3/hour air flow
  • Two nozzles: one flat and one round

The closest petrol models in terms of price are still significantly more expensive, clocking in at £100+. They have comparable air flow, but many of them have a vacuum function where the Parkside does not. They also tend to weigh significantly less, so if weight is a concern then you might prefer to bite the bullet and pay extra for something lighter.

Read our first look review of the Lidl Parkside Petrol Leaf Blower to see how it measured up in the eyes of our gardening experts.

Which sort of petrol should I use?

It is generally recommended that unleaded fuel used for leaf blowers does not have a higher ethanol content than 10% – this is because ethanol attracts water which can cause corrosion if fuel is left in the tank for long periods.

E10 fuel is fine to use, but super unleaded with an ethanol content of 5% is better and what we would recommend.

It’s good practice to empty the fuel tank as much as possible – and completely if not in use over winter. Petrol is better stored in a bespoke container rather than in the machine.

How to find the best leaf blower

First of all, do you need a vacuum or not? With one you won’t need to pick up leaves manually, which should save you work. On the other hand, vacuums often struggle with damp leaves and are sometimes tricky to switch between blow and vacuum mode.

Good features to keep an eye out for include a waterproof collection bag, comfortable shoulder straps, and metal mulching blades that are easily accessible. A narrow nozzle will also help you direct the air jet with more power and precision.

Keep an eye on the weight too. Most leaf blowers fall within the 3-4kg range, but an electric leaf blower in vacuum mode can exceed 6kg. while a petrol model can push upwards 9kg – and that’s before being filled up with leaves.

Use our leaf blower reviews to find the right model for your needs. 

Do you need a leaf blower at all?

Perhaps the better question is to ask is whether you need a leaf blower at all. With corded models you’re limited by the length of the cable, making them best suited to smaller lawns and driveways. If your garden is that small and you’re able to put in the work, a rake or broom could manage it too. It will also be a lot quieter for your neighbours too.

A rake or broom is always going to be more environmentally friendly than a leaf blower, so if you want to be more sustainable you should stick to those where possible.

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